HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Penn researchers determine structure of binding site of colon-cancer drug and its protein target

(Philadelphia, PA) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have determined the precise molecular details of how Erbitux, a recently approved colorectal cancer drug, binds to its target on cancer cells. Knowing this chemical configuration will lead to better drug design for this family of cancer medications.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men and women, as well as the second-leading cause of cancer-related death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Erbitux works by binding to a protein on the surface of cancer cells, thereby halting excessive cell growth that leads to tumors. Kate Ferguson, PhD, Assistant Professor of Physiology, and colleagues, describe their findings in the April cover article of Cancer Cell.

"By having determined the structure of Erbitux bound to its cellular target receptor, we get new insight into how the drug blocks the receptor's cell growth-promoting activities, and can use this to guide future drug design," says Ferguson.

As is characteristic of many epithelial cancers such as cancers of the head and neck, breast, ovary, lung, and pancreas the surface of cancer cells possess abnormally high levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the protein that interacts with Erbitux. These receptors are made up of three parts: one outside the cell; another passing through the cell membrane; and the third inside the cell. In a cancer cell, an extracellular hormone binds to the outer piece of EGFR, and causes the inside part to kick off a series of reactions that signal the cancerous cell to replicate and divide.

Ferguson and colleagues determined that Erbitux works to halt cell proliferation by blocking EGFR's molecular doorway, disallowing hormones to bind and signal tumor growth. X-ray crystallography provided a snapshot of the interaction between Erbitux and the extracellular component of the cancer cell's receptors. '"/>

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
18-Apr-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Innovative tagging technique may help researchers better protect fish stocks
2. Penn researchers discover how key protein stops inflammation
3. ASU researchers partner with UOP to make biofuel for military jets a reality
4. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
5. Penn researchers discover pathway that eliminates genetic defects in red blood cells
6. U-M researchers find family of on switches that cause prostate cancer
7. 2007 EURYI: 20 young researchers to receive Nobel Prize-sized awards for breakthrough ideas
8. Pets could be source of multiresistant bacteria infections in humans, MU researchers investigate
9. MGH researchers confirm that bone marrow restores fertility in female mice
10. Smithsonians National Zoo researchers use electronic eggs to help save threatened species
11. U-M researchers identify gene involved in breast cancer

Post Your Comments:
(Date:12/22/2014)... 2014 Holiday Season may be the brightest ever for ... the long anticipated floodgates for consumer biometrics may finally ... phones, tablets, and wearable mobile devices that incorporate biometrics ... with nearly 4.8 billion biometric devices by 2020.   ...
(Date:12/19/2014)... Dec. 18, 2014   LaunchKey , the first decentralized ... and Internet of Things era, today announced the close ... round was led by Metamorphic Ventures with participation from ... VegasTechFund, and others.  LaunchKey has raised $4 million to ...
(Date:12/17/2014)... , Dec. 16, 2014 Valencell, a leader in ... biometric technology to industry leaders such as Intel, Jabra, ... validated, biometric wearable products. These products will be showcased ... Las Vegas . "Our ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):First Season of Holiday Shopping with Mobile Biometric Payments Wraps Up With a Present for Biometrics Industry: A Rosy Forecast for More Than 2 Billion Users of 4.8 Billion Mobile Biometric Devices by 2020 2LaunchKey Raises $3 Million in Additional Funding Led by Metamorphic Ventures 2LaunchKey Raises $3 Million in Additional Funding Led by Metamorphic Ventures 3Valencell PerformTek Biometrics Power the Most Accurate Wearables at CES 2015 2
(Date:1/22/2015)... GEA Niro Soavi the leader in high pressure ... 2000, which is ideal for new applications for processing ... . This compact laboratory homogenizer is the perfect solution ... additives and ingredients as well as for the ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... Crystal Diagnostics (CDx) Xpress System, a rapid ... AOAC-PTM Certifications for the six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli ... to as STEC or the “Big-6”) as well as Escherichia ... per 325 g of raw ground beef and raw beef ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... Selexis SA, a serial innovation company with ... used for drug discovery to commercial manufacturing, announced today ... Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data packages. The NGS analysis ... ensuring the integrity of the gene, validation of the ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... GenoSpace , a precision medicine software company that has developed ... of genomic, imaging and other biomedical data in research and ... , CEO of Aspera, an IBM Company, to its board ... "We are pleased to welcome Michelle ...
Breaking Biology Technology:GEA Niro Soavi Announces the PandaPLUS 2000 Homogenizer for Processing New Applications for Nanoemulsions and Cell Disruption 2Crystal Diagnostics Awarded AOAC-PTM Accreditation for the Rapid Detection of “Big 6” E.coli Food Pathogens 2Selexis Generated Research Cell Banks Now Fully Sequenced Using Next-Generation Sequencing 2GenoSpace Expands Board with Appointment of Michelle Munson 2
Cached News: