HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Prehistoric remains reveal a drastic shift in northern fur seal ecology

Washington, DC -- Northern fur seals have experienced major changes in their behavior, ecology, and geographic range of over the past 1,000 years, according to a new study appearing in the May 21 early online edition of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using techniques from archaeology, biochemistry, and ecology, a team of researchers* has reconstructed the species prehistoric geographical range. Among other results, the scientists found that the northern fur seals reproductive behavior was very different in the past than it is today.

"We were able to see changes in biogeography and behavior over time scales longer than ecologists usually think about," said lead author Seth Newsome, a postdoctoral researcher at Carnegies Geophysical Laboratory who performed much of the work as a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Today, the main breeding colony of northern fur seals is on the Pribilof Islands in the Bering Sea. But the species once had major breeding colonies at more hospitable latitudes in California, the Pacific Northwest, and the eastern Aleutian Islands. Their bones are abundant in archaeological sites in these regions, suggesting that they were prevalent in local marine ecosystems and also that they were important to human cultures. Prehistoric northern fur seals also nursed their young for much longer than modern fur seals, which wean their pups just four months after birth.

Newsome said the study is important because fur seals and many other species were decimated by commercial harvesting long before scientists were able to study them first hand. "What we consider natural for a species may not have been its natural state prior to human disturbance," he added.

The disappearance of northern fur seals from some temperate regions coincided with the arrival of Russian and European fur traders about 200 years ago. But in central and northern California, fur seal popu
'"/>

Contact: Seth Newsome
snewsome@ciw.edu
202-478-8987
Carnegie Institution
21-May-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Prehistoric origins of stomach ulcers uncovered
2. Prehistoric decline of freshwater mussels tied to large-scale maize cultivation
3. Prehistoric jawbone reveals evolution repeating itself
4. Journal of Nuclear Medicines impact grows, remains consistently high over past 5 years
5. UI anthropologist, colleagues discover remains of earliest giant panda
6. Researcher to determine why oil still remains from Exxon Valdez
7. Hope remains for Alzheimers sufferers
8. Genetic research remains hidden
9. Students discover 11,000 year old remains of Irish Elk
10. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
11. Satellite tracking reveals threats to Borneo pygmy elephants

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/14/2014)... is how to produce enough food to feed the ... Agriculture Organization of the United Nations predicts that food ... to feed a growing global population, and plants are ... production. Plants—grains, cereals, fruits, vegetables, and more—feed humans ... must tap into our knowledge of how plants work ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... Montreal, October 14, 2014 – High doses of fish oil ... fibrillation, a common type of irregular heartbeat in which the ... The results of the AFFORD trial led by the Montreal ... American College of Cardiology on October 7th. , For ... antiarrhythmic therapy were randomly assigned to 4 grams of fish ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... – A team of scientists led by researchers ... and the University of Miami Miller School of ... key genetic pathway underlying bipolar (manic depressive) disorder, ... for treating bipolar affective disorder, as well as ... new findings, published online this week in Nature ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 3Rare genetic disease protects against bipolar disorder 2Rare genetic disease protects against bipolar disorder 3
(Date:10/22/2014)... 22, 2014 Involution Studios , ... of a new infographic, Understanding Ebola . ... beautifully designed, easy to follow informative tool for anyone ... outbreak, symptoms and prevention. , "As the news has ... 2014 Ebola outbreak represents not only a healthcare crisis ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... 22, 2014 Currently offering a ... & D Weighing, Rice Lake, and Ohaus, Pipette.com ... . The Sartorius CPA Semi-Micro Balance is ideal ... precise, and user-friendly laboratory balance. , Sartorius is ... their laboratory balances are well known for their ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... Physicians Choice Laboratory Services (PCLS) ... which enables healthcare providers to individualize therapeutic treatments ... results, healthcare providers are better able to assess ... minimizing risks for adverse drug reactions and interactions. ... FDA [1] more than 2.2 million adverse drug ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... , Oct. 22, 2014   Synthetic Biologics, Inc. ... pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, announced today ... a Notice of Allowance for a composition of matter ... C. difficile program, SYN-004. This is Synthetic Biologics, ... the U.S. and adds to the Company,s extensive ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Involution Studios' Ebola Infographic Provides Key Disease Information and Statistics at a Glance 2Pipette.com Launches the Addition of Sartorius CPA Semi-Micro Balance to Their Product Portfolio with Special Promotional Pricing 2Pipette.com Launches the Addition of Sartorius CPA Semi-Micro Balance to Their Product Portfolio with Special Promotional Pricing 3PCLS Announces Expansion of Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetic Testing Menu 2PCLS Announces Expansion of Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetic Testing Menu 3Synthetic Biologics Announces Allowance of Key U.S. Composition of Matter Patent for C. difficile Program 2Synthetic Biologics Announces Allowance of Key U.S. Composition of Matter Patent for C. difficile Program 3Synthetic Biologics Announces Allowance of Key U.S. Composition of Matter Patent for C. difficile Program 4
Cached News: