HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Purdue researchers align nanotubes to improve artificial joints

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Researchers at Purdue University have shown that artificial joints might be improved by making the implants out of tiny carbon tubes and filaments that are all aligned in the same direction, mimicking the alignment of collagen fibers and natural ceramic crystals in real bones.

The researchers already have shown in a series of experiments that bone cells in Petri dishes attach better to materials that possess smaller surface bumps than are found on conventional materials used to make artificial joints. The smaller features also stimulate the growth of more new bone tissue, which is critical for the proper attachment of artificial joints once they are implanted.

Now, the Purdue researchers have shown even more enhanced cell adhesion and growth when so-called "nanotubes" and nanofibers are aligned in the same direction. This orientation is similar to the way collagen and natural ceramic crystals, called hydroxyapatite, are aligned in bone, said Thomas Webster, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue.

Findings were presented at two recent scientific conferences in research papers written by Webster; Purdue physics doctoral student Dongwoo Khang; and three researchers from the Seoul National University in South Korea, physics doctoral students Minbaek Lee and Sun Namkung, and physics professor Seunghun Hong.

Previous experiments in the Purdue lab have shown that about one-third more bone-forming cells, or osteoblasts, attach to carbon nanotubes that possess surface bumps about as wide as 100 nanometers, or billionths of a meter. Fewer bone cells stick to conventional titanium, which has surface features on the scale of microns, or millionths of a meter.

The nanometer-scale bumps mimic surface features of proteins and natural tissues, prompting cells to stick better and promoting the growth of new cells, Webster said. The findings also suggest that using such nanometer-scale materials might
'"/>

Contact: Thomas Webster
twebster@purdue.edu
765-496-7516
Purdue University
23-Nov-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Purdue-IU researchers explore new method for early disease diagnosis
2. Alzheimers drug based on Purdue -- designed inhibitor begins clinical trials
3. NIH selects Purdue to use phi29 DNA packaging motor for National Nanomedicine Development Center
4. IU, Purdue selected for major NCI biomarker tools initiative
5. Purdue creates new low-cost system to detect bacteria
6. Industry, C-SPAN leaders energize Lugar-Purdue summit
7. Purdue researchers find switch for skeletal-muscle atrophy
8. Purdue project could help pets serve as disease watchdogs
9. Purdue biologists clarify how a cellular spacecraft opens its airlock
10. Purdue scientists see biochemistrys future - with quantum physics
11. Purdue scientists treat cancer with RNA nanotechnology

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/21/2020)... ... August 19, 2020 , ... ... expo uniting life science, data science, informatics and IT leaders goes VIRTUAL and ... period of uncertainty and change, Bio-IT takes the leadership role of keeping our ...
(Date:8/7/2020)... , ... August 06, 2020 , ... ... participate in the prestigious National STEM Scholar Program, a unique professional development program ... and project support for middle school science teachers nationwide. , Created in partnership ...
(Date:7/22/2020)... ... July 21, 2020 , ... USDM Life Sciences ... compliance, announces a new solution to manage regulated workloads on Microsoft Azure. , ... technology stack complies with FDA and global regulations. USDM's new managed service for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... ... leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, ... have entered into a strategic partnership whereby Catalent will provide support for the ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... MIAMI (PRWEB) , ... July 29, 2020 , ... ... nearly 200 of the top radiation centers in 16 countries, has reached its ... years, SDX® is now in routine use at top universities including University of ...
(Date:7/22/2020)... , ... July 22, 2020 , ... Join experts from ... Lorenc, Sr. Manager Regulatory Solutions, in a one hour live webinar on ... regulating body in China for drugs and medical devices. Specifically, for medical devices, the ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... , ... “We are thrilled to deliver this new technology to the industry” ... kind on the market and we were pleased that the IFT jury recognized that.” ... ingredients, creating a natural way to extend the shelf life and improve the safety ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: