HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Rapid syphilis testing in Haiti will prevent congenital disease and stillbirths

NEW YORK (May 28, 2007) -- Congenital syphilis is a major preventable public health problem in many developing countries, frequently causing stillbirths or neonatal death and disabling children who survive. Often undiagnosed or untreated, syphilis is passed from mother to child -- even when mothers take part in prenatal programs to prevent the spread of HIV.

Now, new research from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Groupe Haitien d'Etude du Sarcome de Kaposi et des Infections Opportunistes (GHESKIO) published in the May issue of the open-access journal PLoS Medicine finds that integrating a new rapid syphilis test into prenatal HIV testing programs in Haiti can prevent more than 2,000 cases of stillbirth, neonatal death or congenital syphilis.

"We have shown that by working with the HIV prevention program infrastructure, we can better prevent transmission of syphilis from mother to child at minimal incremental cost. These findings not only give guidance to public health efforts in Haiti, but may serve as a model for projecting the benefits of similar efforts in Africa and in other resource-poor settings," says Dr. Bruce R. Schackman, lead author of the study and associate professor and chief of the Division of Health Policy in the Department of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical College.

Researchers compared three strategies for screening pregnant women for syphilis. The first strategy, the standard of care in rural Haitian areas without access to syphilis laboratory testing, is assessing symptoms and treating if symptoms are found. The second, considered the standard in urban areas, is a blood test for antibody response to the syphilis bacterium -- an approach that requires a one-week waiting period for follow-up and treatment. The third strategy is rapid testing that permits immediate diagnosis and treatment initiation at a single clinic visit.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are more than 2
'"/>

Contact: Andrew Klein
ank2017@med.cornell.edu
212-821-0560
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College
28-May-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Rapid evolution of defense genes in plants may produce hybrid incompatibility
2. Rapid-fire jaws propel ants to safety
3. Biological diversity and human health; Rapid autopsy program; Snake bites and more
4. Rapid genomic and physiological responses for social dominance
5. How a zebra lost its stripes: Rapid evolution of the quagga
6. Rapid, new test develped for inherited immune deficiency
7. Modular leukemia drug shows promise in early testing
8. XDx to present recent success with AlloMap molecular expression testing
9. Potential genetic testing for substance abuse raises hope, concern
10. U-M team: Genetic testing sheds light on degenerative eye disease
11. Antiretroviral resistance testing in HIV infected patients improves health and saves costs

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/24/2014)... and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ... identify arterial plaque that is at high risk of ... At issue is the plaque that builds up in ... deemed "vulnerable," meaning that they are more likely to ... or stroke. , "Existing state-of-the-art technologies are capable of ...
(Date:4/24/2014)... turtle is the largest river turtle in North America, ... almost a century. Now researchers from Florida and the ... one species but three. , Examining museum specimens ... in this ancient reptile. , Once heavily hunted for ... of Campbell,s Turtle Soup in the 1960s the ...
(Date:4/23/2014)... data shows Africa,s Congo rainforest, the second-largest tropical rainforest ... greenness over the past decade. , The study, led ... of New York, shows between 2000 and 2012 the ... intensified. The research, published Wednesday in Nature , ... explore the effects of long-term drought on the Congo ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New ultrasound device may add in detecting risk for heart attack, stroke 2Two new US turtle species described 2Two new US turtle species described 3NASA satellites show drought may take toll on Congo rainforest 2NASA satellites show drought may take toll on Congo rainforest 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... 15, 2014 2013 was a banner ... State Technologies®. They saw continued independent research led by ... were awarded a $1 million grant from the Susanne ... and Behavior” a peer reviewed journal, Amy Grant highlighted ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 , Time: 6 ... Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. , Details: The Hepatitis ... finding a cure for hepatitis B and improving the quality ... Crystal Ball on Friday, April 11 at Warrington Country Club ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... pet owners drew up their lists of New Year,s resolutions for ... of my furry companion." Nowadays there are pet salons, dog and ... take the little canine or feline darlings along wherever mommy or ... pricey toys at the pet store. But anyone who has ever ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... MA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 iLab Solutions, ... Detwiler as the new Director of Product Strategy. In this ... well as iLab sub-teams to guide in the development of ... iLab provides the maximum possible benefit to the scientific community ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2New Year's Resolution: Give Pets the Gift of Top-Notch Health Care 2iLab Solutions Announces Michelle Detwiler as the New Director of Product Strategy 2
Cached News: