HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Rehydrate -- your RNA needs it

ANN ARBOR, Mich.---Water, that molecule-of-all-trades, is famous for its roles in shaping the Earth, sustaining living creatures and serving as a universal solvent.

Now, researchers at the University of Michigan and the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic have uncovered two previously unknown roles for water in RNA enzymes, molecules which themselves play critical roles in living cells and show promising medical applications.

The researchers' findings will be published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) this week.

RNA enzymes, also known as ribozymes, accelerate chemical reactions inside cells, just as their better-known protein counterparts do. And just as a protein enzyme is not a static structure, a ribozyme also changes shape, cycling back and forth between active and inactive forms (called conformations).

In earlier work, a team led by U-M's Nils Walter, associate professor of chemistry, found that modifications made anywhere on the ribozyme molecule---even far from the site where the chemical reaction occurs---affect the rates at which the enzyme changes conformation and catalyzes the reaction. Something similar had been seen in protein enzymes, but never before in RNA enzymes.

The earlier finding, published in PNAS two years ago, suggested that information about changes in distant parts of the ribozyme travels through some sort of network to the core of the molecule, where chemical reactions take place. The latest work shows that water molecules trapped inside the ribozyme's core are essential components of that network.

The network acts like a jostling crowd at a cocktail party, where hydrogen bonds---weak, electrostatic attractions between molecules or parts of molecules---take the place of handshakes. Water molecules trapped in ribozymes can form hydrogen bonds with other water molecules or with parts of the ribozyme molecule.

"The way we in
'"/>

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan
22-Aug-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Nanowaste needs attention of EPA, industry and investors
2. Who needs environmental monitoring?
3. Cancer cells reprogram energy needs to grow and spread, study suggests
4. US needs to plan for climate change-induced summer droughts
5. Public shares views on environmental, health and safety research needs for nanoscale materials
6. Nanotech safety needs specific government risk research strategy and funding
7. Scientist Andrew Maynard to testify on nanotechnology research needs
8. Thorium poised to meet worlds energy needs
9. NSET releases document: EHS research needs for engineered nanoscale materials
10. NSET to release EHS research needs assessment for engineered nanoscale material
11. New Queens study offers environmentally friendly solution to oil industry needs

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 08, 2020 , ... Overcoming Comparability ... Regulation, An FDAnews Webinar, Wednesday, July 22, 2020 • 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. EDT, ... is the most effective way to complete one? Will the study comply with ...
(Date:7/1/2020)... ... July 01, 2020 , ... Catalent, a global ... of Teva-Takeda Pharmaceuticals’ packaging facility in Minakuchi, located in the Shiga prefecture of ... located in Kakegawa, the new 60,000-square-foot facility will provide customers with flexible clinical ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 23, 2020 , ... ... services, today announced that the company has received ISO9001:2015 certification for the ... and research industries. The decision to pursue ISO9001 accreditation demonstrates Kemp’s commitment ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 16, 2020 , ... Medial EarlySign , a ... prevention of high-burden diseases, and Centric Consulting, a business and technology consulting firm, ... existing data in order to identify and prioritize patients for care. , Combining ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... July 08, 2020 , ... ... services and products, announces a significant expansion of laboratory operations through its ... for agencies implementing testing programs. , Bode-CARES provides a turnkey ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... , ... July 09, 2020 , ... ... 1-phenyl-2-thiourea (PTU) is commonly used to suppress pigment formation in zebrafish embryos, maintaining ... research team led by Dr MA has been using the zebrafish model to ...
(Date:7/7/2020)... DIEGO (PRWEB) , ... July 06, 2020 , ... R3 ... new program featuring up to 200 million stem cells. Depending on the patient's condition, ... seniors in the US will die having some form of Alzheimers dementia, and the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: