HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Research highlights how bacteria produce energy

ORLANDO May 22, 2006 -- The world's smallest life forms could be the answer to one of today's biggest problems: providing sustainable, renewable energy for the future. Using a variety of natural food sources, bacteria can be used to create electricity, produce alternative fuels like ethanol and even boost the output of existing oil wells, according to research being presented this week at the 106th General Meeting of the (ASM) American Society for Microbiology in Orlando, Florida.

"Microbial fuel cells show promise for conversion of organic wastes and renewable biomass to electricity, but further optimization is required for most applications," says Derek Lovley of the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Earlier this month, Lovley announced at a meeting that he and his colleagues were able to achieve a 10-fold increase in electrical output by allowing the bacteria in microbial fuel cells to grow on biofilms on the electrodes of a fuel cell.

This week, Gemma Reguera, a researcher in Lovley's lab will present data identifying for the first time how these bacteria are able to transfer electrons through the biofilms to the electrodes.

"Cells at a distance from the anode remained viable with no decrease in the efficiency of current production as the thickness of the biofilm increased. These results are surprising because Geobacter bacteria do not produce soluble molecules or 'shuttles' that could diffuse through the biofilm and transfer electrons from cells onto the anode," says Reguera.

She and her colleagues discovered that the bacteria produce conductive protein filaments, or pili 'nanowires,' to transfer electrons. The finding that pili can extend the distance over which electrons can be transferred suggests additional avenues for genetically engineering the bacteria to further enhance power production.

Researchers from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico announce that they have genetically engineered the
'"/>

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology
22-May-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Gilbert Foundation and American Fed for Aging Research award grants on Alzheimers disease
2. Research shows skeleton to be endocrine organ
3. Research aims to identify markers for menopausal women at risk for deadly blood clot
4. Research team enlightens the reasons for severe blindness
5. Research teams uncover risk genes for multiple sclerosis
6. Research shows NPD1 protects a key component of vision
7. Researchers find pathway that controls cell size and division
8. Researchers watch antibiotics, bacteria meet at atomic level
9. Researchers discover gene responsible for Restless Legs Syndrome
10. Research study describes the role part of the brain plays in memory
11. NY Stem Cell Foundations 2nd Annual Translational Stem Cell Research Conference

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Research highlights how bacteria produce energy

(Date:7/21/2014)... Growers of annual bedding plant seedlings or plugs ... a large stem diameter and high root dry ... during shipping and transplant. To achieve these desirable ... on supplemental lighting from high-pressure sodium lamps during ... diodes (LEDs) can give greenhouse growers other lighting ...
(Date:7/21/2014)... their cells are stressed when facing temperature extremes. Worse ... in the cell are slowed down more than others, ... of whack. Yet, those cells manage to keep their ... Rochester and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory have found ... of proteins is a key process in all cells, ...
(Date:7/20/2014)... A study of 473 sets of twins followed since ... of 24-month-old identical twins had language delay compared to ... the rate of late language emergence of single-born children. ... , The results of the study were published in ... Hearing Research . , University of Kansas Distinguished ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):LEDs shine in bedding plant production study 2When temperatures get cold, newly-discovered process helps fruit flies cope 2Large twin study suggests that language delay due more to nature than nurture 2Large twin study suggests that language delay due more to nature than nurture 3
(Date:7/22/2014)... Dr. Williams says, “Bush has joined ... that the greatest health care system in the world ... deadly while trying to serve the public. Unfortunately, Bush ... transform an enormous system that none of them can ... continuing series of Open Letters ( http://is.gd/wdU2CM ) provides ...
(Date:7/21/2014)... Applying just the right amount of tension to a ... metallic conductor to an insulator, according to Rice University ... a hard-to-make, one-dimensional chain of carbon atoms -- by ... in ways that engineers might find useful for mechanically ... Rice theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his colleagues appears ...
(Date:7/21/2014)... , July 21, 2014  Mike Patterson, CEO ... $1.6 million in Series Seed B funding to ... sensors for the life science, defense, intelligence, and ... Partners led the round and was joined by ... Said Patterson , "This round of funding ...
(Date:7/20/2014)... Richland, Wash. -- When nuclear fuel gets recycled, the ... uranium in rock contaminates basements with the related gas ... these gases, and research appearing July 20 in ... let the gases in but not out. , ... or hazardous radioactive elements from nuclear fuel or air ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dr. Ira Williams Asks What’s Wrong With Jonathan Bush’s Book, Where Does It Hurt? 2Carbyne morphs when stretched 2Carbyne morphs when stretched 3Global Graphene Manufacturing Leader, Graphene Frontiers, Receives Series Seed B Funding To Assure Production Of The Next Generation Of Biological And Chemical Sensor Technology 2A noble gas cage 2A noble gas cage 3
Cached News: