HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers devise new tools to help pinpoint treatments for heart failure

term yet is detrimental in the long term.

The key enzyme in heart muscle signaling, PKA, is a member of a huge class of regulatory proteins called kinases. Each kinase is specialized to attach a phosphate molecule to a specific set of target proteins. These phosphorylation reactions switch targeted proteins from an inactive state to an active state. PKA actually activates other kinases, which in effect amplify the effect of PKA through a signaling cascade.

The activity of kinases is delicately balance by a group of enzymes called protein phosphatases, which simply remove phosphate groups from specific proteins, inactivating them. About 30 percent of all human proteins are regulated by kinases and phosphatases.

Activation of PKA is actually initiated at the exterior surface of heart cells where neurotransmitters and hormones bind to beta-adrenergic receptors. However, while drugs that boost PKA activity temporarily increased cardiac contractions, they also led to higher patient mortality in the long term.

A widely used class of drugs is called beta-blockers. Drugs in that class, including Atenolol, Bisoprolol, and Metoprolol are designed to take the opposite approach: they block the beta-adrenergic receptors, thereby reducing PKA activity and lowering cardiac output. Beta blockers are now taken daily by about 5 million U.S. patients suffering from heart failure, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases. The effectiveness of beta blockers has highlighted the need to better understand the system of biochemical signaling within heart cells.

For example, the clinical observations and experimental findings of many scientists suggest that increasing the strength of heart cells contraction may be less beneficial to patients than restoring the normal PKA-dependent control system. During heart failure, the heart muscle contracts weakly, which causes the body to compensate by releasing more hormones and neurotrans
'"/>

Contact: Rex Graham
ragraham@ucsd.edu
858-822-3075
University of California - San Diego
7-Aug-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4 5

Related biology news :

1. Researchers find pathway that controls cell size and division
2. Researchers watch antibiotics, bacteria meet at atomic level
3. Researchers discover gene responsible for Restless Legs Syndrome
4. Researchers witness natural selection at work in dramatic comeback of male butterflies
5. Researchers discover human embryonic stem cells are the ultimate perpetual fuel cell
6. Researchers use new approach to predict protein function
7. Researchers probe risks, benefits of folic acid fortification
8. Researchers identify genetic mutation that may alter tumor cell proliferation
9. Researchers discover method for identifying how cancer evades the immune system
10. Researchers use adult stem cells to create soft tissue
11. Researchers find gene that spurs development of the epididymis

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... New Rochelle, NY, April 17, 2014The development of stem ... on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based ... Cross have discovered a new marker that is highly ... human umbilical cord blood, which they describe in an ... journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Professor Marc Andr Gauthier and Professor Luca Razzari ... each been awarded large grants from the John ... for Innovation (CFI) for the acquisition of state-of-the-art ... be added matching grants from the Ministre de ... et de la Technologie (MESRST). These new laboratories ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... German . ... also provide us with a continuous stream of information about ... sit still in a car the world glides by ... Seemingly without effort, our brain calculates self-motion from this "optic ... a steady gaze during our own movements. Together with biologists ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New state-of-the-art biotech and nanotech equipment for INRS 2How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away 2How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away 3How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away 4
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce ... , an e-Journal and producer of Food Labs ... year for the co-location of Food Labs Conference to be ... the registration fee to attend the two-day Food Lab Conference, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 ­ RedBrick Health , a fast-growing leader ... announces that EmblemHealth , the New ... now providing the RedBrick Compass health assessment, combined with ... of its members. EmblemHealth is among the first health ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... NY (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 The Microcompetition ... a major disease. One of these latent viruses is the ... rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory ... theory, a study found that RA patients have high concentrations ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... TaiGen Biotechnology Company, Limited ("TaiGen") today announced that they ... Russian pharmaceutical company, to develop and commercialize nemonoxacin (Taigexyn ... , Turkey and other members ... antibiotic for the treatment of bacterial infections including those ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Pittcon Announces Second Year Partnership With Food Safety Tech 2Pittcon Announces Second Year Partnership With Food Safety Tech 3EmblemHealth Selects RedBrick Health to Power its Next-Generation Health Engagement and Behavior Change System 2EmblemHealth Selects RedBrick Health to Power its Next-Generation Health Engagement and Behavior Change System 3Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 4
Cached News: