HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers provide study of early heart development and underlying cause of congenital heart defects

Researchers at The Burnham Institute for Medical Research have provided detailed insights into the early formation of the heart. A team lead by Dr. Rolf Bodmer found that two proteins, called Robo and Slit, are required for normal development of the heart and that malfunction of either of these proteins severely impacts the heart's structure, resulting in congenital heart defects. These findings were published in the journal Current Biology released on December 20th.

Congenital heart defects involve the malformation in one or more structures of the heart or blood vessels while the fetus is developing in the uterus. According to the American Heart Association, congenital heart disease affects about 35,000 infants each year, and claims the lives of "nearly twice as many children" annually in the United States "as die from all forms of childhood cancer". Symptoms may arise at birth, during childhood, and sometimes not until adulthood.

Working with Drosophilia melanogaster, also known as the fruitfly, the researchers showed that the Slit and Robo proteins accumulate in a specific alignment during the formation of the heart tube, a linear tube representing the primitive heart before its cells assume their rhythmical contractile functions. Proper alignment of the heart tube cells is critical for heart assembly and proper shape, or morphology. The researchers found that mutation or misexpression of these proteins leads to misalignment of the heart tube and results in observed heart defects.

"Although there is much interest in the understanding of the basis of heart tube assembly, little is known about the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that orchestrate heart development," said Rolf Bodmer, Ph.D., Professor at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research and corresponding author in the study. "These findings provide understanding of early controls in heart development, and we are eager to conduct further studies to reveal how t
'"/>

Contact: Nancy Beddingfield
nbeddingfield@burnham.org
858-646-3146
Burnham Institute
20-Dec-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers find pathway that controls cell size and division
2. Researchers watch antibiotics, bacteria meet at atomic level
3. Researchers discover gene responsible for Restless Legs Syndrome
4. Researchers witness natural selection at work in dramatic comeback of male butterflies
5. Researchers discover human embryonic stem cells are the ultimate perpetual fuel cell
6. Researchers use new approach to predict protein function
7. Researchers probe risks, benefits of folic acid fortification
8. Researchers identify genetic mutation that may alter tumor cell proliferation
9. Researchers discover method for identifying how cancer evades the immune system
10. Researchers use adult stem cells to create soft tissue
11. Researchers find gene that spurs development of the epididymis

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017  higi, the health IT company that ... North America , today announced a Series B ... of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition accelerates higi,s ... to transform population health activities through the collection and ... higi collects and secures data today on behalf ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... ROCKVILLE CENTRE, N.Y. , March 27, 2017 ... by Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) ... Analytics Outpatient EMR Adoption Model sm . In ... top 12% of U.S. hospitals using an electronic ... recognized CHS for its high level of EMR ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric ... of around 15.1% over the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 ... market estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on global ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... Bay, Florida (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 ... ... and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted orphan drug designation to SBT-100, its novel ... (sdAb) for the treatment of osteosarcoma. SBT-100 is able to cross the cell ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , ... October 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, ... his local San Diego Rotary Club. The event entitled “Stem Cells ... and had 300+ attendees. Dr. Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... of 13 prestigious awards honoring scientists who have made outstanding ... a scheduled symposium during Pittcon 2018, the world’s leading conference and exposition for ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... The ... medical marijuana products targeting the needs of consumers who are incorporating medical marijuana ... place in Phoenix, Arizona. , As operators of two successful Valley dispensaries, The ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: