HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Rutgers: GM/GMO/Biotech crop containment strategy

New Brunswick, N.J. Plant geneticists at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, may have solved one of the fundamental problems in genetically engineered or modified (GM or GMO) crop agriculture: genes leaking into the environment.

In a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Rutgers Professor Pal Maliga and research associate Zora Svab advocate an alternative and more secure means of introducing genetic material into a plant. In GM crops today, novel genes are inserted into a cell nucleus but can eventually wind up in pollen grains or seeds that make their way out into the environment.

The two researchers at Rutgers Waksman Institute of Microbiology argue for implanting the genes into another component of the cell the plastid where the risk of escape is minimized. Plastids, rarely found in pollen, are small bodies inside the cell that facilitate photosynthesis, the basic life process in plants.

Our work with a tobacco plant model is breathing new life into an approach that had been dismissed out-of-hand for all the wrong reasons, said Maliga. Introducing new agriculturally useful genes through the plastid may prove the most effective means for engineering the next generation of GM crops.

Skeptics had claimed that the approach was ineffective, based on 20-year-old genetic data showing that 2 percent of the pollen carried plastids. In the new study, Svab and Maliga found plastids in pollen 100- to 1000-times less frequently. This is well below the threshold generally accepted for additional containment measures.

The agricultural community worldwide seems to be embracing GM crops because the technology has the potential to deliver more healthful and nutritious crops, and increase crop yields with less use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

A News Focus story in the May 25 issue of the journal Science reported that genetically modified crops are flou
'"/>

Contact: Joseph Blumberg
blumberg@ur.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
6-Jun-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Medical leaders meet to commemorate National Biocontainment Lab construction start
2. New strategy for treating allergic disorders
3. Does EPA have an adequate strategy to oversee nanotechnologies?
4. High blood pressure medication strategy proves effective in Hispanic women
5. Scientists identify new strategy for preventing acute and chronic brain disease
6. International risk research strategy and funding needed for nanotech safety
7. Study shows metabolic strategy of stressed cell
8. Trojan horse strategy defeats drug-resistant bacteria
9. Targeting the adrenal gland could be key strategy against heart failure, Jefferson scientists show
10. Drug strategy makes cancer genes get lost in translation
11. Researchers develop new strategy for the treatment of CML

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/8/2019)... , ... October 07, 2019 , ... The future of ... the genetic level, resulting in people living longer, healthier lives. But it will be ... earth. , Leroy E. Hood, MD, PhD, Chief Strategy Officer and Co-Founder of the ...
(Date:10/3/2019)... ... 02, 2019 , ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a human ... approved clinical trial for stem cell treatment of knee osteoarthritis . The successful enrollment ... a subsidiary of VetStem Biopharma. , PSC CEO, Michael Dale, stated, “We are proud ...
(Date:9/30/2019)... ... September 30, 2019 , ... As human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) ... the development and diseases of the human heart, there is an increasing need for ... muscle cells to be clearly and easily recorded. A study released today in STEM ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Drug resistance has been declared as one of the biggest ... one of the most serious concerns. Hong Kong cannot be spared from the worsening ... or a seven-fold of the figure in 2007 – the year the disease became ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 24, 2019 , ... The Grain Foods Foundation is ... Advisory Board. Dr. Holscher is an Assistant Professor of Nutrition in the Department ... the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where she has affiliate appointments with the Institute ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 17, 2019 , ... ... Delaney, Director, Project and Clinical Supplies Management, Asia Pacific (APAC) will present at ... Hotel, Singapore, on Sept. 25-26, 2019. , On Thursday, Sept. 26, at 10:10 ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Jennifer Hermansky and Fang Xie, Ph.D. , ... Law360’s 2019 Rising Stars. Hermansky and Xie, named an Immigration Rising Star and a ... 39 practice areas. The list highlights attorneys “whose legal accomplishments transcend their age,” according ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: