HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Scientists develop protein-sequence analysis tool

With more and more protein sequence data available, scientists are increasingly looking for ways to extract the small subset of information that determines a protein's function. In addition to sorting out what makes related proteins differ, such information can also help scientists engineer proteins to do new jobs.

Now scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have written a computer program "to sort the informational 'wheat' from the 'chaff,'" said Brookhaven biochemist John Shanklin, who leads the research team. The program, which is described in the open access journal BMC Bioinformatics*, makes comparisons of groups of related proteins and flags individual amino acid positions that are likely to control function.

Biochemists are interested in identifying "active sites" -- regions of proteins that determine their functions -- and learning how these sites differ between paralogs, proteins that have different functions that arose from a common ancestor. The new program, called CPDL for "conserved property difference locator," identifies positions where two related groups of proteins differ either in amino acid identity or in a property such as charge or polarity.

"Experience tells us that such positions are likely to be biologically important for defining the specific functions of the two protein classes," Shanklin said.

When the Brookhaven team used the program to scan three test cases, each consisting of two groups of related but functionally different enzymes, the program consistently identified positions near enzyme active sites that had been previously predicted from structural and or biochemical studies to be important for the enzymes' specificity and/or function. "This suggests that CPDL will have broad utility for identifying amino acid residues likely to play a role in distinguishing protein classes," Shanklin said.

Scientists have already used such comparative sequence analysis t
'"/>

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory
30-Nov-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
2. Scientists prove that disputed Korean stem cell line comes from an unfertilized egg and not cloning
3. Scientists move closer to bio-engineered bladders
4. Scientists find stem cell switch
5. Scientists discover new way to study nanostructures
6. Scientists a step closer to understanding how anaesthetics work in the brain
7. Scientists to make news at Computational Biology Conference
8. Accident-prone? Scientists link brain function to knee injuries
9. Scientists take next step in understanding potential target for ovarian cancer treatment
10. Scientists find brown fat master switch
11. Scientists identify 2 distinct Parkinsons networks

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/11/2019)... ... 10, 2019 , ... Improved Pharma LLC announces the publication of “Predictive and ... The article was published online on April 29th, 2019. The authors are Stephen ... Chen of Purdue University. , The article is the most recent addition to a ...
(Date:6/6/2019)... ... June 05, 2019 , ... Pelican BioThermal , ... station and service center in Mexico City, Mexico. Mexico is the second largest ... more than $1.75 billion in pharmaceutical exports since 2015. The Mexico City network ...
(Date:6/4/2019)... ... June 04, 2019 , ... In’Tech Medical SAS ( ... Q1-19 revenues of $31M, up 12% from Q1-18. The growth is associated with ... & operational excellence initiatives worldwide. , Laurent Pruvost , President & CEO ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/25/2019)... ... 24, 2019 , ... Inference Solutions , a global ... announced global availability of Inference Studio’s latest version, which makes it easier for ... the power of Google’s Contact Center AI (CCAI). , As consumers ...
(Date:4/16/2019)... ... April 16, 2019 , ... On April 24th, the Federal ... Army Center for Environmental Health Research (USACEHR), with an award for their cooperative ... a veteran-owned company located at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center, Inc. (FITCI) on ...
(Date:4/15/2019)... ... April 15, 2019 , ... Sirrus, Inc., a developer ... bench plant expansion to increase production of methylene malonate monomers and oligomers. , ... of Sirrus’ full-scale production facility, which is scheduled to break ground in 2019. ...
(Date:4/10/2019)... ... April 10, 2019 , ... ... into multiple agreements to help companies advance their innovations to clinical testing ... from synthetic biology companies that are gene editing therapeutic cells for advanced ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: