HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Scientists discover two-component lantibiotic with therapeutic potential

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- The discovery and preparation of a naturally occurring antibiotic could open the door to new therapeutic drugs for treating nasty infections.

The rapid spread of drug-resistant bacterial strains poses a persistent threat to human health, and requires new sources of antibiotics to treat infections. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are tackling this problem by discovering and preparing natural antibiotics called lantibiotics.

Lantibiotics are a class of very potent antimicrobial compounds whose antimicrobial properties are attributed to their structure. They possess unusual sulfur bridged rings that provide structural rigidity for binding their cellular targets. Lantibiotics are commonly used in the food industry to inhibit the growth of microorganisms.

"Having the ability to make analogs of these naturally occurring antibiotics gives us the flexibility to look for improvements in properties such as toxicity, biostability and bioavailability," said Wilfred van der Donk, a William H. and Janet Lycan Professor of Chemistry at the U. of I. He is a corresponding author of a paper that will be posted online this week ahead of regular publication by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In previous work, van der Donk first identified the molecular activity of an enzyme (LctM) responsible for naturally turning a small protein into a lantibiotic. That discovery, reported in the journal Science in 2004, involved lacticin 481, a lantibiotic produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium used in cheese production.

In March 2006, van der Donk's team reported, again in Science, the synthesis of the lantibiotic nisin. The most studied lantibiotic, nisin has been used as a food preservative for more than 40 years without the development of significant antibiotic resistance.

Then, in the Oct. 26 issue of Chemistry and Biology, the team demonstrated that LctM could accept subst
'"/>

Contact: James E. Kloeppel
kloeppel@uiuc.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
30-Oct-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
2. Scientists prove that disputed Korean stem cell line comes from an unfertilized egg and not cloning
3. Scientists move closer to bio-engineered bladders
4. Scientists find stem cell switch
5. Scientists discover new way to study nanostructures
6. Scientists a step closer to understanding how anaesthetics work in the brain
7. Scientists to make news at Computational Biology Conference
8. Accident-prone? Scientists link brain function to knee injuries
9. Scientists take next step in understanding potential target for ovarian cancer treatment
10. Scientists find brown fat master switch
11. Scientists identify 2 distinct Parkinsons networks

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... Double-stapled peptide inhibits RSV infection , Respiratory ... lower respiratory tract infections, generating life-threating illness in ... preventive therapies are limited. RSV enters host cells ... a six-helix fusogenic bundle. Small interfering peptides that ... however, these peptides are highly susceptible to degradation. ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety ... cell populations based on cell surface markers. Researchers from ... that is highly expressed in a type of stem ... describe in an article in BioResearch Open Access ... publishers. The article is available free on the ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... that fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers are ... like persistent organic pollutants (POPs). , The ... University of Toronto Scarborough PhD student Matt Binnington ... levels of environmental contamination, a mother,s compliance with ... body influenced exposure in her children. , Their ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014 2JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014 3JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014 4JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014 5JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014 6Fish consumption advisories fail to cover all types of contaminants 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... TX (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 More ... disease, and about 1 in 3 seniors will die ... source ). These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans ... and, hopefully, help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 The Microcompetition with ... major disease. One of these latent viruses is the Epstein ... arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease ... a study found that RA patients have high concentrations of ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2013 was a banner year of continued ... saw continued independent research led by the team at ... $1 million grant from the Susanne Marcus Collins Foundation, ... peer reviewed journal, Amy Grant highlighted Brainwave Optimization® in ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... Toronto, ON (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 ... an experimental new therapy for the treatment of tinnitus. ... unique tinnitus frequency, and over a period of weeks to ... Notched Sound Therapy in two forms: Notched Music and Notched ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3
Cached News: