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Scientists making advances in cancer to receive international awards

Leading scientists whose work in research laboratories, universities and medical centers is helping to understand and eradicate cancer will be recognized April 1-5, 2006, by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) at its 97th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

A series of awards is given annually by the AACR the world's oldest and largest professional society representing cancer scientists from the United States and more than 60 other countries to honor world-class accomplishments in basic research, clinical care, therapeutics and prevention. Each recipient presents a lecture at the AACR Annual Meeting.

"We are privileged to acknowledge just a few of the extraordinary men and women who, over the years, have given us a clear understanding of how cancer evolves and of the signals that drive and nourish its growth and spread, and those who have improved patient care and preventive strategies," said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), AACR chief executive officer.

"This is an exciting time in cancer research, and the AACR award winners are among the leaders in this new era of discovery, therapeutics, and treatment," she added.

Each award has its own selection committee composed of members of the AACR. Peers and colleagues nominate the award candidates.

This year's winners are:

Carlo M. Croce, M.D., The John Wolfe Professor for Cancer Research, Chairman, Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Director, Human Cancer Genetics Program at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus, will receive the 46th AACR-G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award for his for his seminal contributions that revolutionized leukemia and lymphoma research and treatment. The AACR and Eli Lilly and Company established this award in 1961 to honor Dr. Clowes, a founding member of AACR and a research director at Eli Lilly. The award the oldest given by AACR recognizes an i
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Contact: Yarissa Ortiz
ortiz@aacr.org
215-440-9300
American Association for Cancer Research
24-Mar-2006


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