HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Scientists making advances in cancer to receive international awards

Leading scientists whose work in research laboratories, universities and medical centers is helping to understand and eradicate cancer will be recognized April 1-5, 2006, by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) at its 97th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

A series of awards is given annually by the AACR the world's oldest and largest professional society representing cancer scientists from the United States and more than 60 other countries to honor world-class accomplishments in basic research, clinical care, therapeutics and prevention. Each recipient presents a lecture at the AACR Annual Meeting.

"We are privileged to acknowledge just a few of the extraordinary men and women who, over the years, have given us a clear understanding of how cancer evolves and of the signals that drive and nourish its growth and spread, and those who have improved patient care and preventive strategies," said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), AACR chief executive officer.

"This is an exciting time in cancer research, and the AACR award winners are among the leaders in this new era of discovery, therapeutics, and treatment," she added.

Each award has its own selection committee composed of members of the AACR. Peers and colleagues nominate the award candidates.

This year's winners are:

Carlo M. Croce, M.D., The John Wolfe Professor for Cancer Research, Chairman, Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Director, Human Cancer Genetics Program at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus, will receive the 46th AACR-G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award for his for his seminal contributions that revolutionized leukemia and lymphoma research and treatment. The AACR and Eli Lilly and Company established this award in 1961 to honor Dr. Clowes, a founding member of AACR and a research director at Eli Lilly. The award the oldest given by AACR recognizes an i
'"/>

Contact: Yarissa Ortiz
ortiz@aacr.org
215-440-9300
American Association for Cancer Research
24-Mar-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
2. Scientists prove that disputed Korean stem cell line comes from an unfertilized egg and not cloning
3. Scientists move closer to bio-engineered bladders
4. Scientists find stem cell switch
5. Scientists discover new way to study nanostructures
6. Scientists a step closer to understanding how anaesthetics work in the brain
7. Scientists to make news at Computational Biology Conference
8. Accident-prone? Scientists link brain function to knee injuries
9. Scientists take next step in understanding potential target for ovarian cancer treatment
10. Scientists find brown fat master switch
11. Scientists identify 2 distinct Parkinsons networks

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/23/2014)... a newly coined term for novels and films which focus ... of Copenhagen shows how these fictions serve as a mental ... climate change and imagine other living conditions. , "Global ... the atmosphere; it is also a cultural phenomenon in which ... the films we see. And there are so many of ...
(Date:4/23/2014)... at the University of Houston (UH) is working to ... His work is supported by a $1.8 million grant ... Blood transfusions save millions of lives every year. They ... for instance, routine surgeries would become life threatening. This ... that transfusions of red blood cells stored in a ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... There,s a new secret to get your child to behave ... , A new Cornell study published in Eating Behaviors ... they had to bite with their front teeth such as ... rowdier than when these foods had been cut. ... as aggressive toward other kids," said Brian Wansink, Professor and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Fiction prepares us for a world changed by global warming 2Fiction prepares us for a world changed by global warming 3UH biomedical engineer works to make blood transfusions safer 2UH biomedical engineer works to make blood transfusions safer 3Biting vs. chewing 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 More than 5 ... about 1 in 3 seniors will die with Alzheimer’s ... These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans into looking ... help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. Jonathan Weisman, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 DTS Language Services, Inc . ... Portal for Life Science organizations who need document translations. ... matter of their documents in advance with a selection of ... of translations, often a critical factor in clinical and scientific ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... AudioNotch is the internet's leading provider of Notched Sound ... Patients listen to sound therapy that is tailor-made for ... to months, their tinnitus volume decreases. , AudioNotch has previously ... Notched White Noise. Now, AudioNotch is pleased to announce to ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Carahsoft and ... Thursday, January 23, 2014 at 2pm EST (11am PST), ... The topic focuses on how technology can turn raw, ... decisions for government agencies. The online webinar will last ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2DTS Improves Efficiency for Life Science Document Translations 2Webcast - Natural Language Processing: Converting Raw Data into Actionable Knowledge – Hosted by Carahsoft and CDS Federal Services 2
Cached News: