HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Separate genes influence speed, accuracy in decoding written words in dyslexia

Researchers trying to tease out the genetic basis of dyslexia have discovered a location on chromosome 2 that may contain one or more genes that contribute to the reading disorder and make it difficult for people to rapidly pronounce pseudowords.

The team from the University of Washington, headed by medical geneticists Dr. Wendy Raskind and Ellen Wijsman and developmental psychologist Virginia Berninger, cautioned that the new findings do not mean that scientists have found "the gene" responsible for dyslexia.

"Just as with heart disease, no single gene will provide the answer to what causes dyslexia," said Raskind. "When you look at something that is inherited there could be multiple genes, perhaps as many as a hundred, that contribute to it. And when you look at any characteristic of a person, you must consider the environmental background. There are other factors besides genes that could modify a behavior."

The study, published in the March issue of the journal Molecular Psychiatry, is noteworthy for two reasons. First, it points to a new location containing genes that contribute to dyslexia. Second, the gene or genes at that location are involved in speed of decoding changing written words into spoken words without clues to their meaning a basic and persistent component of dyslexia.

Building on previous findings by the UW team on familial patterns of accuracy and rates of decoding, the research also provides the first evidence identifying separate genetic influences on these abilities.

"In other published and in-press research we have shown that accuracy of decoding may be a bridge to reading at one stage of learning to read and rate of decoding may be a bridge at a later stage. Effective instructional techniques for each bridge are not necessarily the same and typically require more than teaching as usual," said Berninger, who heads the UW's Learning Disabilities Center.

The UW researchers used pseudowords, or what Berni
'"/>

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington
30-Mar-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Separate genetic mutations gave people, chimps bitter-taste sensitivity
2. Interaction of just 2 genes governs coloration patterns in mice
3. Gene regulation, not just genes, is what sets humans apart
4. Study finds gender differences in renal and other genes contributing to blood pressure
5. New databases put wings on search for bipolar risk genes
6. Research teams uncover risk genes for multiple sclerosis
7. Risk genes for multiple sclerosis uncovered
8. Sour taste make you pucker? It may be in your genes
9. U-M, Israeli scientists report major advance in search for genes associated with colon cancer
10. Rapid evolution of defense genes in plants may produce hybrid incompatibility
11. Alcohol abuse is in the genes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/31/2018)... ... 2018 , ... USDM Life Sciences , the leading risk management, technological ... received the 2018 Services Partner of the Year, Awarded for Innovation from Box, a ... Development and Platform Sales, Niall Wall and received by USDM Life Sciences CEO, Kevin ...
(Date:8/26/2018)... LINDA, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... August 23, 2018 ... ... the potential it has for increased sensitivity and specificity over more commonly used ... the instrumentation and the added burden of development and validation of methods that ...
(Date:8/23/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... August 22, 2018 , ... ... release of LimitLIS® 4.0, the latest version of its rapidly growing cloud-based laboratory ... LimitLIS® Toxicology Edition, as well as the company’s triple digit growth throughout 2018, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/31/2018)... ... August 29, 2018 , ... A recent expedition ... Southampton and the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, demonstrated how ... the exploration and study of hard to reach deep sea ecosystems, like intermittently ...
(Date:8/29/2018)... ... August 28, 2018 , ... Inc. Magazine ... has been ranked in 1138th place on the 27th annual Inc. 5000, the ... list represents the most successful companies within the American economy’s most dynamic segment ...
(Date:8/26/2018)... ... 23, 2018 , ... LabRoots , the leading provider ... world, will host the 4th Annual Microbiology and Immunology Virtual Event September 12-13. ... various research areas including medicine, agriculture, and space. , During the free, ...
(Date:8/21/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... August 21, ... ... a software company specializing in medical device compliance and commercialization, has just ... Cockpit® platform. , Written and presented by Dr. Mario Kossmann, ESEP at ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: