HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Separate genes influence speed, accuracy in decoding written words in dyslexia

Researchers trying to tease out the genetic basis of dyslexia have discovered a location on chromosome 2 that may contain one or more genes that contribute to the reading disorder and make it difficult for people to rapidly pronounce pseudowords.

The team from the University of Washington, headed by medical geneticists Dr. Wendy Raskind and Ellen Wijsman and developmental psychologist Virginia Berninger, cautioned that the new findings do not mean that scientists have found "the gene" responsible for dyslexia.

"Just as with heart disease, no single gene will provide the answer to what causes dyslexia," said Raskind. "When you look at something that is inherited there could be multiple genes, perhaps as many as a hundred, that contribute to it. And when you look at any characteristic of a person, you must consider the environmental background. There are other factors besides genes that could modify a behavior."

The study, published in the March issue of the journal Molecular Psychiatry, is noteworthy for two reasons. First, it points to a new location containing genes that contribute to dyslexia. Second, the gene or genes at that location are involved in speed of decoding changing written words into spoken words without clues to their meaning a basic and persistent component of dyslexia.

Building on previous findings by the UW team on familial patterns of accuracy and rates of decoding, the research also provides the first evidence identifying separate genetic influences on these abilities.

"In other published and in-press research we have shown that accuracy of decoding may be a bridge to reading at one stage of learning to read and rate of decoding may be a bridge at a later stage. Effective instructional techniques for each bridge are not necessarily the same and typically require more than teaching as usual," said Berninger, who heads the UW's Learning Disabilities Center.

The UW researchers used pseudowords, or what Berni
'"/>

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington
30-Mar-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Separate genetic mutations gave people, chimps bitter-taste sensitivity
2. Interaction of just 2 genes governs coloration patterns in mice
3. Gene regulation, not just genes, is what sets humans apart
4. Study finds gender differences in renal and other genes contributing to blood pressure
5. New databases put wings on search for bipolar risk genes
6. Research teams uncover risk genes for multiple sclerosis
7. Risk genes for multiple sclerosis uncovered
8. Sour taste make you pucker? It may be in your genes
9. U-M, Israeli scientists report major advance in search for genes associated with colon cancer
10. Rapid evolution of defense genes in plants may produce hybrid incompatibility
11. Alcohol abuse is in the genes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/17/2017)... , April 17, 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... announces the filing of its 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K ... Commission. ... 10-K is available in the Investor Relations section of the Company,s ... the SEC,s website at http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 According to a new market ... Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, Vertical, ... Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 to ... of 17.3%. ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... , Apr. 11, 2017 Research and ... Market 2017-2021" report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at a ... report, Global Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on ... covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... , ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the ... Especially those living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , ... pollution-affected countries globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today confirmed licensing rights that give it exclusive global ... technology developed in collaboration with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). Additionally, ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... SomaGenics announced the receipt of a Phase ... (Single Cell), expected to be the first commercially available ... from single cells using NGS methods. The NIH,s recent ... development of approaches to analyze the heterogeneity of cell ... for measuring levels of mRNAs in individual cells have ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... The award-winning American Farmer television series will ... American Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. , With global population estimates ... of how to continue to feed a growing nation. At the same time, many ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: