HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Silence of the amoebae

Freedom of expression is great, but silence is golden at least when it comes to amoebae, which are intestine-dwelling parasites that cause life-threatening dysentery in many parts of the world. Three years ago, scientists at the Weizmann Institute accidentally discovered a way to silence the expression of a key amoebic gene, one which codes for a toxic protein that kills human intestinal cells infected with this devastating illness. Now the scientists have developed a way to successfully silence the expression of two additional virulence genes in the same amoebae.

Rivka Bracha and colleagues in the lab of Prof. David Mirelman in the Biological Chemistry Department had shown that expression of the gene coding for the toxic protein could be prevented by inserting a plasmid (a small loop of DNA) containing a copy of a specific part of that gene into the amoeba cell nucleus. Introducing the plasmid led to the modification of DNA "packing" proteins, causing the DNA-protein packages to become more tightly coiled something like a tangled telephone cord and causing an irreversible silencing of gene expression. In a recent paper published in PLoS Pathogens, the Weizmann scientists report the silencing of two additional virulence genes in the same amoebae using a similar plasmid-induced principle.

The disabled amoebae, though rendered harmless, still display the same repertoire of surface antigens (markers recognized by the immune system) as the disease-causing strain. The scientists now plan to test the ability of these silenced amoebae to serve as a live vaccine by evoking an intestinal immune response. If successful, it may put an end to amoebic diseases that claim the lives of thousands yearly and afflict millions more.


'"/>

Contact: Jennifer Manning
jennifer@acwis.org
212-895-7952
American Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science
30-Aug-2006


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Silenced gene in worm shows role in regeneration
2. Silenced gene suggests greater risk, possible marker for African-Americans with prostate cancer
3. Silence the gene, save the cell: RNA interference as promising therapy for ALS

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/4/2019)... ... April 02, 2019 , ... Catalent Pharma Solutions, ... biologics and consumer health products, today announced that it will host a roundtable ... National Harbor Hotel, Oxon Hill, Maryland, on April 10-12, 2019. , On Thursday, ...
(Date:4/4/2019)... ... April 03, 2019 , ... R3 Stem Cell ... its nationwide Centers of Excellence. R3 wants patients to feel secure when they ... protect patients from Centers that use inferior regenerative biologics, protocols or amounts, R3 ...
(Date:3/29/2019)... , ... March 28, 2019 , ... ... (PT) programme, a new PT programme entirely dedicated to Chinese biobanks was launched ... and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) and the Biobank Branch, China Medicinal Biotech Association (BBCMBA). ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/4/2019)... ... April 03, 2019 , ... LeadingBiotech, an exclusive event series ... announces its Boston CEO conference to be held May 28-29, 2019 at Boston’s ... with high-level panels and discussions from past, present and future change-makers. ...
(Date:3/27/2019)... ... , ... A leader in the field of Regenerative Veterinary Medicine, VetStem Biopharma ... and Canada since 2004. The primary indications for VetStem Regenerative Cell Therapy are ... cat, and horse. Recently, VetStem teamed up with the world-renowned San Diego Zoo ...
(Date:3/27/2019)... ... ... Lachman is sponsoring the event on April 1-4, where they will be ... team on site will be available to discuss strategies and tactics to support Facilities ... , Executives from Lachman participating at this year’s conference include Fran Zipp, President & ...
(Date:3/23/2019)... ... March 22, 2019 , ... ... Multi-Angle Light Scattering (MALS) detector , offering a revolutionary approach for the measurement ... proteins, and biopolymers. A novel optical design, a unique cell-block assembly, and a ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: