HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Standardized microarrays may bring us one step closer

A new study by 64 renowned scientists may bring us one step closer to personalized medical treatment--that is, medical treatment tailored to each person's unique genetic make-up and medical condition. The study shows researchers how to get more consistent and reliable results when using a technology called microarrays or gene chips. Microarrays allow scientists to see how differences in gene expression are linked to specific diseases. Improving and standardizing microarray experiments will also allow earlier detection of diseases like cancer.

"The microarray is fairly new so, right now, researchers are using a lot of different methods and protocols in microarray experiments. That makes it hard for researchers to compare their results to results from other labs," said Kenneth Olden, Ph.D., Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). "When scientists start using the same methods, equipment and reagents, data can be compared across the entire field of medicine and scientific advances will come more quickly."

The study, conducted by the Toxicogenomics Research Consortium, which is funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health, was initiated in 2001 to asses what causes variation in gene expression experiments within and between labs, as well as within and between microarray platforms. The TRC is a consortium of 7 research centers including: NIEHS Microarray Group of the National Center for Toxicogenomics, Duke University, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/University of Washington, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Icoria Inc. was also a research partner. The paper appears in the May issue of Nature Methods.

The researchers systematically examined the processes involved in most microarray or gene expression studies, and found that using a standardized
'"/>

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
21-Apr-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Standardized house dust aids health researchers
2. Carnegie Mellon U. transforms DNA microarrays with standard Internet communications tool
3. MIT study: Maturity brings richer memories
4. Variant CJD -- Prion amplification breakthrough brings new insights and hopes for a blood test
5. Extracting eggs from pre-pubertal cancer patients brings hope for future fertility
6. Discovery could help bring down price of DNA sequencing
7. US conservation efforts bring more marine turtles to UK
8. US conservation efforts bring more marine turtles to UK
9. Swell gel could bring relief to back pain sufferers
10. Dilbert of academia brings humor to talk at UH
11. Disorderly protein brings order to cell division

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Standardized microarrays may bring one step closer

(Date:4/20/2014)... long known that people with Down syndrome have a ... childhood, they haven,t been able to explain why. ... uncovered a connection between the two conditions. , In ... Nature Genetics , the researchers track the genetic chain ... syndrome to the cellular havoc that occurs in ALL. ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... emergency contraceptive pills in Peru found that 28 ... substandard quality or falsified. Many pills released the ... active ingredient. One batch had no active ingredient ... drugs, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology ... quickly assess suspected counterfeit drugs and then characterize ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... world population predicted to reach 9 billion by ... that considers human-altered landscapes such as farmland, according ... habitat that supports it might be an increasingly ... three-quarters of the land surface is directly affected ... human-caused impacts such as climate change. But what ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Dana-Farber researchers uncover link between Down syndrome and leukemia 2Dana-Farber researchers uncover link between Down syndrome and leukemia 3Counterfeit contraceptives found in South America 2Counterfeit contraceptives found in South America 3Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife 2Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife 3Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife 4
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 2013 was a banner year ... Technologies®. They saw continued independent research led by the ... awarded a $1 million grant from the Susanne Marcus ... Behavior” a peer reviewed journal, Amy Grant highlighted Brainwave ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 AudioNotch is the ... therapy for the treatment of tinnitus. Patients listen to ... and over a period of weeks to months, their tinnitus ... in two forms: Notched Music and Notched White Noise. Now, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 , Time: ... 1360 Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. , Details: The ... to finding a cure for hepatitis B and improving the ... annual Crystal Ball on Friday, April 11 at Warrington Country ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Diego, CA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 ... on the products of cells grown under simulated embryonic ... international license agreement with Suneva Medical, Inc. for physician-dispensed ... (CCM). , This agreement is an amendment ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 3
Cached News: