HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Steroid hormones regulate the body clock

A central pacemaker structure in the brain controls diurnal rhythms of behavior and hormone release. However, biological clocks are also encountered in almost every cell type (so-called peripheral clocks), in which they regulate daily changes in cell biology, including cell division. Very little is known to date about how the two clock systems interact. By examining zebrafish strains with defects in hormone production, Nicholas Foulkes and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Tuebingen find that peripheral clocks require the steroid hormone cortisol to generate daily rhythms of cell proliferation. Their work is published this week in the open-access journal PLoS Biology.

To guarantee normal growth and to avoid tumor formation, the timing of cell division must be under strict control. Interestingly, the daily changes in cortisol levels observed in normal zebrafish are not required to achieve this control; treating the cortisol-deficient strains with constant levels of a drug that mimics the effects of cortisol restores normal cell-division rhythms. Thus, it appears that internal cell timers cooperate with hormonal signals to regulate the timing of cell division.


'"/>

Contact: Natalie Bouaravong
press@plos.org
415-568-3445
Public Library of Science
19-Mar-2007


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Steroids, not songs, spur growth of brain regions in sparrows
2. Steroid discoveries could add bulk to crop harvests
3. Role of thyroid hormones in slumber under investigation at Rutgers
4. Stress hormones may play new role in speeding up cancer growth
5. Computational analysis shows that plant hormones often go it alone
6. ENDO 2006 offers breaking research on the metabolic syndrome, obesity, hormones in women and more
7. Social factors not hormones cause PMS, post-natal depression and menopausal stress
8. New male contraceptive targets sperm, not hormones
9. Hyena mothers give their cubs a helpful dose of hormones
10. Females, alcohol and hormones
11. Alcohol consumption disrupts breastfeeding hormones

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/7/2018)... ... November 07, 2018 , ... uBiome, the leader in ... Computational Biosciences Program within the Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, to ... around the world, Dr. Lozupone will bring to uBiome an expertise on the ...
(Date:11/7/2018)... ... November 07, 2018 , ... The awards were presented ... science industry. The event was attended by 150 industry executives from leading life ... drug discovery. The winners were determined by responses to an online ballot completed ...
(Date:11/3/2018)... FALLS CHURCH, Va. (PRWEB) , ... November 01, ... ... Quality: , New Regulations, New Guidance, New Challenges and New Opportunities, **Presented by ... http://www.fdanews.com/trendsmdregquality , Early bird pricing for Emerging Trends ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... Renowned Honolulu veterinarian, Dr. Patrick Leadbeater, has begun ... Dr. Leadbeater, of Kahala Pet Hospital on Oahu, is a skilled ... traveling to the island of Kauai on an almost weekly basis to perform surgery ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... , ... November 13, 2018 , ... ... of the spine technology market last week that asserts it is still trending ... population. , Humad’s analysis describes market consolidation, pricing pressure and increased ...
(Date:11/11/2018)... ... ... Triple W, an innovator of connected health devices, today announced that it ... ®, the first health tech wearable device for incontinence that monitors how full your ... announcement was made during CES Unveiled New York, an invite-only tech event bringing together ...
(Date:11/9/2018)... SEABROOK, N.H. and PHILADELPHIA (PRWEB) , ... November ... ... leading 25-year-old control system integrator of custom industrial automation and IT solutions with ... will be exhibiting at Automation Fair®, taking place at the Pennsylvania Convention Center ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: