HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Stronger evidence found linking Epstein-Barr virus and risk of multiple sclerosis

Boston, MA Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health, Kaiser Permanente, and a team of collaborators have found further evidence implicating the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a possible contributory cause to multiple sclerosis (MS). The study appears in the advance online edition of the June 2006 issue of Archives of Neurology.

MS is a chronic degenerative disease of the central nervous system. Women are more likely than men to get the disease and it is the most common neurologically disabling disease in young adults. Although genetic predisposition plays an important role in determining susceptibility, past studies have shown that environmental factors are equally important.

EBV is a herpes virus and one of the most common human viruses worldwide. Infection in early childhood is common and usually asymptomatic. Late age at infection, however, often causes infectious mononucleosis. In the U.S., upwards of 95% of adults are infected with the virus, but free of symptoms. EBV has been associated with some types of cancer and can cause serious complications when the immune system is suppressed, for example, in transplant recipients. There is no effective treatment for EBV.

The study population was made up of more than 100,000 members of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) health plan, who provided blood specimens as part of medical examinations between 1965 and 1974. The KPNC maintained the medical records of all its members, including those who provided specimens, in electronic databases. Between 1995 and 1999, those databases were searched for evidence that would indicate a possible diagnosis of MS.

The researchers selected 42 individuals diagnosed with MS and that had serum specimens collected before the date of diagnosis. Two controls for each case were then selected from the serum database and matched by sex, date of blood collection, and age at time of blood collection.

The study's main finding was th
'"/>

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-3952
Harvard School of Public Health
11-Apr-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Stronger therapy better for AML with normal genetics
2. No evidence that widely prescribed statins protect against prostate cancer
3. Progesterone therapy and preterm birth: More evidence helps identify women who can benefit
4. CU researchers discover evidence of very recent human adaptation
5. Research finds evidence tropical cyclones have climate-control role
6. New evidence of human culture among primates
7. Study advances evidence for receptors role in alcohol pleasure and problems
8. Study provides first genetic evidence of long-lived African presence within Britain
9. More human-Neandertal mixing evidence uncovered
10. First evidence to show elephants, like humans, apes and dolphins, recognize themselves in mirror
11. New MUHC study adds more evidence to clear measles mumps rubella vaccine as a risk factor for autism

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/4/2019)... ... ... Stay on top of current hot topics through free webinars presented by leading experts ... so be sure to register today to save your place! Participate in the discussion ... upcoming webinars, or click below to learn more about each webinar: , CLINICAL TRIALS, ...
(Date:12/25/2018)... ... December 24, 2018 , ... Researchers at the Icahn ... new use for a long-standing computational concept known as “blacklisting,” which is commonly ... messages. Using blacklisting as a filter to single out genetic variations in patient ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... ... , ... NDA Partners Chairman Carl Peck, MD, announced today that Deb ... Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), has been appointed a Partner in the firm. Ms. ... has more than 25 years of regulatory experience. In addition to her FDA career, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/8/2019)... ... January 08, 2019 , ... The American Society of ... were named by a selection committee made up of industry leaders identified by the ... Development grants are mentored awards created to support ASGCT members designing transformative pilot studies ...
(Date:1/4/2019)... , ... January 01, 2019 , ... ... Microbiome Conference at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting January 22-25, 2019 held ... is invitation-only. , The World Economic Forum Annual Meeting brings together leaders of ...
(Date:12/20/2018)... ... December 20, 2018 , ... New Year’s brings reflection and desire to ... in the European Union (EU) on the horizon, Jim Kasic, president and CEO of ... to the EU Medical Device Regulation (MDR), digital health, and big data are just ...
(Date:12/18/2018)... ... December 17, 2018 , ... ... cohort of emerging biosciences ventures invited to participate in the annual program. Twelve ... fundable business plans and a professional network. All startups receive an entrepreneur coach, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: