HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Study shows cats can succumb to feline Alzheimer's disease

Ageing cats can develop a feline form of Alzheimer's disease, a new study reveals. Scientists at the Universities of Edinburgh, St Andrews, Bristol and California have identified a key protein which can build up in the nerve cells of a cat's brain and cause mental deterioration.

In humans with Alzheimer's disease, this protein creates 'tangles' inside the nerve cells which inhibit messages being processed by the brain. The team says that the presence of this protein in cats is proof that they too can develop this type of disease.

By carrying out post-mortem examination of cats which have succumbed naturally to the disease, scientists may now be able to uncover vital clues about how the condition develops. This may eventually help scientists to come up with possible treatments.

Scientists already thought cats were susceptible to dementia because previous research had identified thick, gritty plaques on the outside of elderly cats' brain cells which are similar to those found in humans. But, by pinpointing this second key marker, the Edinburgh-led team says we can be sure that cats can suffer from a feline form of Alzheimer's.

Dr Danielle Gunn-Moore, at the University of Edinburgh's Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, said: "This newly discovered protein is crucial to our understanding of the ageing process in cats. We've known for a long time that cats develop dementia, but this study tells us that the cat's neural system is being compromised in a similar fashion to that we see in human Alzheimer's sufferers. The gritty plaques had only hinted that might be the case now we know.

"The shorter life-span of a cat, compared to humans, allows researchers to more rapidly assess the effects of diet, high blood pressure, and prescribed drugs on the course of the disease. However, we also need to understand more about our geriatric cats for their own benefit, so we can slow down the degeneration the disease brings
'"/>

Contact: Linda Menzies
Linda.Menzies@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Edinburgh
5-Dec-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
2. Study finds gender differences in renal and other genes contributing to blood pressure
3. Study suggests estrogen deficiency can lead to obesity-induced high blood pressure after menopause
4. Study: Sticking to the sand might not be such good, clean fun for beachgoers
5. Study points to new way to predict death risk from torn aorta
6. Study identifies new gene therapy tools for inherited blindness
7. Study finds contaminated water reaching Floridas offshore keys
8. Study sheds light on why humans walk on two legs
9. Study explains how pathogens evolve to escape detection
10. Study finds hereditary link to premenstrual depression
11. Study identifies energy efficiency as reason for evolution of upright walking

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Study shows cats can succumb feline Alzheimer disease

(Date:4/18/2014)... DNA adds a twist to the story of how barnyard ... April 21 in the journal Proceedings of the National ... of chickens that lived 200-2300 years ago in Europe, researchers ... may have looked far different from the chickens we know ... we associate with modern domestic chickens -- such as their ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... R.I. [Brown University] Asteroid and comet impacts can ... on regional or even global scales. But new research ... the signatures of ancient life at the time of ... geologist Pete Schultz has found fragments of leaves and ... several ancient impacts in Argentina. The material could provide ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... most densely forested and most densely populated quadrant of ... needs, values and practices. Disturbances associated with those needs, ... development, have set the stage for management issues of ... , The report Five anthropogenic factors that will ... Northern United States was published recently by ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Ancient DNA offers clues to how barnyard chickens came to be 2Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years 2Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years 3Five anthropogenic factors that will radically alter northern forests in 50 years 2Five anthropogenic factors that will radically alter northern forests in 50 years 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... , January 15, 2014 A study has ... on the Formula 1 track could help to tackle the ... Technologies (MAT), Stowhealth (a GP surgery based in Stowmarket) and ... provider Simplyhealth. Telemetry technology, which is inspired by ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... DTS Language Services, Inc . is pleased ... Life Science organizations who need document translations. Clients will ... their documents in advance with a selection of nearly 50 ... often a critical factor in clinical and scientific fields, and ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... TAIPEI , Jan. 15, 2014 TaiGen Biotechnology ... an exclusive agreement with R-Pharm, a leading Russian pharmaceutical ... in the Russian Federation , ... Commonwealth Independent States (CIS). Nemonoxacin is a novel antibiotic for ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... WASHINGTON , Jan. 14, 2014  3D Communications, a leading provider ... scientific, regulatory, business, and media events in the United ... its former associate Virginia Cox , JD, is returning to ... Virginia Cox re-joins 3D after more than two years ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 2Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 3Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 4DTS Improves Efficiency for Life Science Document Translations 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 4Former FDA Associate Commissioner Returns To 3D Communications 2
Cached News: