HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Study shows how retinoic acid enters a cell's nucleus

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Cornell University researchers have revealed a process that has stumped scientists for many years: exactly how an acid derived from vitamin A enters a cell's nucleus, where it has strong anti-carcinogenic effects.

Discovery of this basic transport mechanism opens a new door for future research on related compounds. The finding has important implications for the fight against cancer and other diseases.

The research, which appears in a recent issue of the journal Molecular Cell (Vol. 18, No. 3), explains for the first time how the cancer-fighting vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) gains entry into a cell's nucleus.

When vitamin A enters a cell's cytoplasm (the portion that lies between the outer membrane and the nucleus), it can be converted to RA, a member of a group of compounds that enter a cell's nucleus and play a role in triggering transcription. This is a basic process for relaying genetic information and switching genes on and off. In this role, RA can inhibit tumor growth. In fact, past clinical trials have shown that RA can help treat leukemia, head, neck and breast cancer. RA and its synthetic derivatives may also be useful in treatment of diabetes, arteriosclerosis and emphysema. Unfortunately, conventional treatments using RA require high, toxic doses, and tumors can develop resistance to the treatment.

Noa Noy, a professor of nutritional sciences at Cornell, and Richard Sessler, the paper's lead author and a graduate student in Noy's lab, wanted to learn how RA is transported into the cell's nucleus. The chemical structure of RA makes it hydrophobic, meaning it is barely soluble in water. But the path from the cell cytoplasm, where RA is made, to the nucleus requires passage through water, a difficult journey for a hydrophobic compound. For RA to rapidly enter a cell's nucleus, it must catch a ride on a water-soluble protein called cellular retinoic acid-binding protein type II (CRABP-II). This prot
'"/>

Contact: Press Relations
pressoffice@cornell.edu
607-255-6074
Cornell University News Service
2-May-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
2. Study finds gender differences in renal and other genes contributing to blood pressure
3. Study suggests estrogen deficiency can lead to obesity-induced high blood pressure after menopause
4. Study: Sticking to the sand might not be such good, clean fun for beachgoers
5. Study points to new way to predict death risk from torn aorta
6. Study identifies new gene therapy tools for inherited blindness
7. Study finds contaminated water reaching Floridas offshore keys
8. Study sheds light on why humans walk on two legs
9. Study explains how pathogens evolve to escape detection
10. Study finds hereditary link to premenstrual depression
11. Study identifies energy efficiency as reason for evolution of upright walking

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/14/2018)... RESTON, Va. (PRWEB) , ... August 14, 2018 ... ... stigmas were recently depicted in the movie “Wonder,” to a better understanding of ... defects treatments, according to editors of the latest special issue of Birth ...
(Date:8/7/2018)... EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (PRWEB) , ... August 06, 2018 ... ... corn growing in front of The NCERC at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s University ... corn, but also grain sorghum and sweet sorghum. These three feedstocks represent conventional ...
(Date:8/2/2018)... ... August 02, 2018 , ... The ... innovator Boston Heart Diagnostics to its Lifestyle Medicine Corporate Roundtable, a group of ... care system and a sustainable world. , Boston Heart is transforming the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/25/2018)... MATEO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... July 25, 2018 ... ... for in vivo research utilizing its state-of-the-art Digital Vivarium™ and Vium Cloud approach ... Schaevitz, Ph.D., to Chief Scientific Officer. Additionally, the company announced the appointment of ...
(Date:7/25/2018)... ... July 25, 2018 , ... John McDonald, CEO ... board of the Indiana India Business Council (IIBC), an advocacy group to strengthen ... current board of directors, McDonald joins an impressive roster of local and national ...
(Date:7/24/2018)... ... July 24, 2018 , ... Boval was founded in 1978 ... reagent suppliers. In Boval’s early days most of the BSA manufactured was for ... BSA for diagnostic purposes after gel cards changed that market and displaced most of ...
(Date:7/22/2018)... ... July 19, 2018 , ... Mitotech ... with Essex Bio-Investment for Phase 3 clinical program in Dry Eye Disease. Under ... SkQ1 with approximately $17m allocated towards the first Phase 3 study starting as ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: