HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Synthetic adhesive mimics sticking powers of gecko and mussel

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Geckos are remarkable in their ability to scurry up vertical surfaces and even move along upside down. Their feet stick but only temporarily, coming off of surfaces again and again like a sticky note. But put those feet underwater, and their ability to stick is dramatically reduced.

Water is an enemy of adhesives, which typically do not work well in wet environments -- think of how long a bandage on your finger lasts. Now two Northwestern University biomedical engineers have successfully married the geckos adhesive ability with that of an animal well known for its sticking power underwater: the mussel.

Combining the important elements of gecko and mussel adhesion, the new adhesive material, called geckel, functions like a sticky note and exhibits strong yet reversible adhesion in both air and water.

The findings, which could lead to applications in medical, industrial, consumer and military settings, will be published as the cover story in the July 19 issue of the journal Nature.

The geckel material should be useful for reversible attachment to a variety of surfaces in any environment, said Phillip B. Messersmith, professor of biomedical engineering at Northwesterns McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science and an author of the paper.

I envision that adhesive tapes made out of geckel could be used to replace sutures for wound closure and may also be useful as a water-resistant adhesive for bandages and drug-delivery patches. Such a bandage would remain firmly attached to the skin during bathing but would permit easy removal upon healing.

A geckos strong but temporary adhesion comes from a mechanical principle known as contact splitting. Each gecko foot has a flat pad that is densely packed with very fine hairs that are split at the ends, resulting in a greater number of contact points than if the hairs were not split. (The diameter of one of the split hairs is as small as 2
'"/>

Contact: Charles Loebbaka
c-loebbaka@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University
18-Jul-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Synthetic peptide targets latent papilloma virus infections
2. Springer to publish new journal Systems and Synthetic Biology
3. Synthetic molecule causes cancer cells to self-destruct
4. Switchable adhesive
5. Natures secrets yield new adhesive material
6. Natures strongest glue could be used as a medical adhesive
7. Semiconductor membrane mimics biological behavior of ion channels
8. New mouse model closely mimics human cancers
9. Researchers create artificial enzyme that mimics the bodys internal engine
10. Mouse mimics chronic leukemia, will aid drug development
11. Finally, JAP study shows headdown bedrest precisely mimics human physiology in spaceflight

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Synthetic adhesive mimics sticking powers gecko and mussel

(Date:8/27/2014)... DURHAM, N.C. -- When we want to listen carefully ... talking. The second thing we do is stop moving ... unwanted sounds generated by our own movements. , This ... deep in the brain. Indeed, indirect evidence has long ... somehow influences the auditory cortex, which gives rise to ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... release is available in German . ... is the most common inherited disease affecting the peripheral ... the Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine and University ... Schwann cells is impaired in rats with the disease. ... layer known as myelin, which facilitates the rapid transfer ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... fishing traps are lost or abandoned each year in ... traps, which continue to catch fish, crabs, and other ... to habitat, fisheries, and the watermen who depend on ... newly published NOAA study. , The report, published in ... of its kind to examine the derelict fish trap ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stop and listen: Study shows how movement affects hearing 2Stop and listen: Study shows how movement affects hearing 3Potential therapy for incurable Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2NOAA's Marine Debris Program reports on the national issue of derelict fishing traps 2
(Date:8/27/2014)... 27, 2014 Rhythm, a biopharmaceutical company developing ... that result in metabolic disorders, announced today that it ... the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) relating to ... common stock. The number of shares to be offered ... yet been determined. Citigroup and Cowen and ...
(Date:8/27/2014)...   MSC , a healthcare performance improvement company ... appointment of Mary Beth Loesch to President ... experience preparing companies for rapid growth and market expansion, ... of Corporate Development and Healthcare. In that role, she ... well as corporate strategy and marketing. Previously, Loesch served ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... , Aug. 27, 2014 Reportlinker.com announces ... in its catalogue: Global Chelating Agents ... About Chelating Agent A chelating agent ... bonds with metal ions, thereby forming a metal-ion ... metal-ions have on chemical processes, formulations, and the ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... MADISON, N.J. , Aug. 27, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... significant potential to help physicians better identify early-stage ... progression and disability, according to a new study ... from Quest Diagnostics (NYSE: DGX ) ... of the 14-3-3eta protein outperformed conventional antibody-serum testing, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Rhythm Files Registration Statement for Proposed Initial Public Offering 2MSC names Mary Beth Loesch President and CEO 2Global Chelating Agents Market 2014-2018 2Global Chelating Agents Market 2014-2018 3Global Chelating Agents Market 2014-2018 4Novel Biomarker Detects Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Better than Conventional Methods Alone, According to Journal of Rheumatology Study 2Novel Biomarker Detects Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Better than Conventional Methods Alone, According to Journal of Rheumatology Study 3Novel Biomarker Detects Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Better than Conventional Methods Alone, According to Journal of Rheumatology Study 4
Cached News: