HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Targeted virus compels cancer cells to eat themselves

HOUSTON -- An engineered virus tracks down and infects the most common and deadly form of brain cancer and then kills tumor cells by forcing them to devour themselves, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The modified adenovirus homed in on malignant glioma cells in mice and induced enough self-cannibalization among the cancer cells -- a process called autophagy -- to reduce tumor size and extend survival, says senior author Seiji Kondo, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at M. D. Anderson.

''This virus uses telomerase, an enzyme found in 80 percent of brain tumors, as a target,'' Kondo says. ''Once the virus enters the cell, it needs telomerase to replicate. Normal brain tissue does not have telomerase, so this virus replicates only in cancer cells.''

Other cancers are telomerase-positive, and the researchers showed in lab experiments that the virus kills human prostate and human cervical cancer cells while sparing normal tissue.

In addition to demonstrating the therapeutic potential of the virus, called hTERT-Ad, Kondo says the international research team also clarified the mechanism by which such conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAs) infect and kill cancer cells.

Autophagy is a protective process that cells employ to consume part of themselves when nutrients are scarce or to destroy some of their organelles to recycle their components. A double membrane forms around the material to be consumed, then everything inside is digested.

Kondo and colleagues showed that hTERT-Ad (short for human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter regulated adenovirus) infected the glioma cells and induced autophagy by inactivating a molecular pathway -- the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway -- that is known to prevent cellular self-cannibalization.

The result was a huge
'"/>

Contact: Scott Merville
sdmervil@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
2-May-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Targeted irradiation: A new weapon against HIV?
2. Targeted drug delivery now possible with pHLIP peptide
3. Targeted therapies showing great promise against colorectal cancer
4. Targeted drug delivery achieved with nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates
5. TAT2005 - 3rd International Symposium on Targeted Anticancer Therapies
6. Features of replication suggest viruses have common themes, vulnerabilities
7. Marijuana component opens the door for virus that causes Kaposis sarcoma
8. Discovery in plant virus may help prevent HIV and similar viruses
9. Detecting transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households
10. CTRC enrolls first patients in novel phase II study for sarcoma -- living virus destroys cancer cell
11. Expert to provide update after worst tomato virus hits California

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/27/2019)... ... November 26, 2019 , ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a ... Foundation and hosted by Dr. Steven Sampson and Dr. Danielle Aufiero of the ... 23, 2019, highlighted the ongoing efforts to promote research, educate the public, and provide ...
(Date:11/22/2019)... ... November 21, 2019 , ... The inventors of ... have announced a major step forward with that therapy, known as SurVaxM. MimiVax ... company, spun off from Roswell Park in 2012, has entered into a China-exclusive ...
(Date:11/19/2019)... ... ... Project Lifeline – a community partnership and research program initiated ... use disorder (SUD) – will take center stage at the upcoming NACDS ... in preventing and treating opioid abuse in Blair County, Pennsylvania, will receive the NACDS ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/30/2019)... ... October 30, 2019 , ... ... the many roles innovation and technology play in educating the next generation of ... hands-on learning opportunities and presentations by WesternU administrators and representatives of companies working ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... October 29, 2019 , ... Researchers ... Using Silios CMS-C multispectral imagers , researchers identified people by the image ... based on retinal imaging, face recognition, fingerprints and vasculature. , The new ...
(Date:10/22/2019)... ... October 22, 2019 , ... Catalent, a global leader in clinical supply services, ... Integration, will participate in a panel session titled “Cell and Gene Therapy Logistics” at ... Gwen Hotel, Chicago, on Oct. 28-30, 2019. , The panel session, on Wednesday, Oct. ...
(Date:10/17/2019)... PARK, Kan. (PRWEB) , ... October 15, 2019 ... ... to 23andMe, a leader among services that offer DNA Testing for health and/or ... so popular. Everywhere you look, it seems that people want to know more ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: