HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Team led by Carnegie Mellon University scientist finds first evidence of a living memory trace

An international team of scientists for the first time has detected a memory trace in a living animal after it has encountered a single, new stimulus. The research, done with honeybees sensing new odors, allows neuroscientists to peer within the living brain and explore short-term memory as never before, according to scientist Roberto Fernndez Galn, a leading author on the report who is currently a postdoctoral research associate at Carnegie Mellon University.

Capturing these memory traces could ultimately provide a completely new way to understand how short-term memory works, stated Galn. The findings are scheduled for January publication in Neural Computation.

"Our findings show that an odor produces a memory trace of synchronized neural activity that lasts several minutes after a bee initially senses it," said Galn. "This is the first time anyone has revealed a short-term, stimulus-specific neural pulse within the living brain that occurs after exposure to a previously unknown stimulus."

"Future investigations along the lines of our study may reveal previously overlooked memory traces in many other neural systems," said C. Giovanni Galizia, Galn's primary collaborator, who is now a professor at Konstanz Universitt in Konstanz, Germany.

Galn performed the work as part of his dissertation research while in the research group of Andreas Herz at the Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany.

The report supports Hebb's theory of learning, a 55-year-old proposition that "neurons that fire together wire together," thereby strengthening their connections. According to the theory, a stimulus activates some neurons while inhibiting others. Once this stimulus is removed, traces of that excitation/inhibition pattern so-called Hebbian reverberations should remain.

"We are the first to observe this phenomenon at the network level. We are also the first to detect a distinct signature, not only of a sensory short-term memory, but
'"/>

Contact: Lauren Ward
wardle@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-7761
Carnegie Mellon University
14-Nov-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Carnegie Mellons Peter Adams receives EPA research grant
2. Carnegie Mellon scientists find key HIV protein makes cell membranes bend more easily
3. Carnegie Mellons David Sholl identifies new materials
4. Carnegie Mellon University scientists identify genes activated during learning and memory
5. Carnegie Mellon University research shows how sensory-deprived brain compensates
6. Carnegie Mellon researchers urge regulators to rethink strategies for soot emission
7. Carnegie Mellon researcher proposes development of artificial cells to fight disease
8. Carnegie Mellon engineers devise new process to improve energy efficiency of ethanol production
9. DNA gets new twist: Carnegie Mellon scientists develop unique DNA nanotags
10. Carnegie Mellons Granger Morgan pens op-ed
11. Carnegie Mellon scientist plays key role in unveiling sea urchin genome

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/28/2014)... juices are associated with a lower risk of developing ... of East Anglia (UEA). , Research published today ... flavanones (both subclasses of dietary flavonoids) significantly decrease their ... of cancer death among women. , The research ... between 25 and 55 for more than three decades. ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... German . ... via electrical signals, they communicate with each other at ... substances, the neurotransmitters, are stored in vesicles at the ... vesicles fuse with the cell membrane and release their ... synapses always have some readily releasable vesicles on standby. ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... breakthroughs may pave the way for vaccines and ... These flatworms, including tapeworms that cause hydatid diseases ... infect more than 300 million people and cause ... to chronic illness and death each year. , ... immunology, and tropical medicine, and scientific director of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Tea and citrus products could lower ovarian cancer risk, new UEA research finds 2Synapses always on the starting blocks 2Synapses always on the starting blocks 3GW researcher adapting breakthrough technologies to combat parasitic worm infections 2
(Date:10/27/2014)... The Italian company Roadrunnerfoot ... sell its artificial "lower limb", after the German ...      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141027/713097 ) , ... definitive judgement has arrived: Roadrunnerfoot, the small Italian ... hi-tech prostheses with composite materials, has won against ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... Kalorama Information says that PCR is demonstrating ... the United States and is the ... said the FDA,s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to authorize the ... detection of the Ebola virus was an indication that ... the IVD industry and its biennial survey on diagnostics ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... (PRWEB) October 27, 2014 New ... SoundConnect , an industry leading unified communication ... partners and agents to deliver cloud-based audio and ... growth opportunities. , With SoundConnect’s Q4 incentive ... twenty-five video and/or web conferencing licenses sold, now ...
(Date:10/27/2014)... 27, 2014 The report “Smart ... Traffic Management, Communication, Monitoring), and by Display (Variable ... 2019” segments the global market into various sub-segments ... also identifies the drivers and restraints for this ... , Browse 75 market tables and 37 figures ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Italian Lower Limb Prosthesis Company Wins Lawsuit Against German Giant Ottobock 2Kalorama: PCR The Go-to Test in Ebola Fight 2Kalorama: PCR The Go-to Test in Ebola Fight 3SoundConnect Unveils Q4 Partner Incentives 2Smart Highway Market by Technology, and Display Expected to Reach $27.992.0 Million by 2019- New Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Smart Highway Market by Technology, and Display Expected to Reach $27.992.0 Million by 2019- New Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Smart Highway Market by Technology, and Display Expected to Reach $27.992.0 Million by 2019- New Report by MarketsandMarkets 4
Cached News: