HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Time to rewrite the species rulebook, MSU scientists say

card catalogue guide to an organism's genetic information.

The MSU scientists downloaded the already-sequenced bacteria genomes from a variety of sites on the Internet. Then they did some cross-card catalogue comparisons.

To their surprise, many bacteria that are considered members of the same species by the current mix and match approach, often share as few as 65 percent of their genes. Humans, in comparison, share 75 percent of their genes with fish.

No one's calling for the species rules to be rewritten so that humans are lumped with their distant underwater relatives. And when it comes to bacteria, the authors say, the current species definition appears to be too liberal.

Much of the differences between genetically-similar bacteria appear to be the result of environmental pressures. E. coli bacteria, for instance, exists everywhere from the intestines of warm blooded animals to paper mills. Any new way of tallying up bacteria species should "accommodate the ecological distinctiveness of the organisms," the authors write.

"The point is about the value of a correct understanding of species people expect a species to have certain traits and live in certain habitats," said Tiedje, whose work is also supported by the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. "If the species definition is not reasonably predictive of this, then it loses its value. This can be important for pathogen identification, quarantine or biotechnology, for example."

Konstantinidis and Tiedje also noted that even bacteria with genetic card catalogues that were as much as 99 percent similar had enough outward differences to be separate species. This shouldn't come as a shock. Humans and chimpanzees, in comparison, share 98.7 percent of their DNA. But that small difference at the genetic level results in a big difference when it comes to outward appearance and Konstantinidis and Tiedje's work is supported by the Bouyoukos Fellowship Progr
'"/>

Contact: Jim Tiedje
tiedje@msu.edu
517-355-0271
Michigan State University
8-Feb-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. New study rewrites evolutionary history of vespid wasps
2. Tiny bones rewrite textbooks
3. West Australian fossil find rewrites land mammal evolution
4. Finding rewrites the evolutionary history of the origin of potatoes
5. Lost forest yields several new species
6. Surprising new species of light-harvesting bacterium discovered in Yellowstone
7. Smithsonians National Zoo researchers use electronic eggs to help save threatened species
8. One species, many genomes
9. Reconstructing the biology of extinct species: A new approach
10. Researchers find 24 species believed new to science in Suriname rainforest
11. Scientists discover 5 new species of sea slugs from the Tropical Eastern Pacific

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Time rewrite the species rulebook MSU scientists say

(Date:7/24/2014)... leads to conflict among people around the world, a ... Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages (HEAL) Program Director ... tackle global biodiversity decline. , The harvest of wild ... and provides protein for more than a billion of ... that today,s unprecedented loss of wildlife, is bringing with ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over ... doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans ... the enormous benefits invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, ... pollination and pest control for crops, decomposition for nutrient ... published in Science and led by UCL, ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... 24, 2014 Some sticky research out of York ... a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva ... Biology Letters , "Ungulate saliva inhibits a grassendophyte ... to red fescue grass (which hosts a fungus called ... slower fungus growth and less toxicity. , "Plants have ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 3Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research 2
(Date:7/23/2014)... and Russian Quantum Center at Skolkovo) and Mario ... the Institute of Physics in Bratislava, Slovakia) have ... particles passing through an amplifier and, conversely, when ... provided in an article published in the journal ... Quantum entangled particles are considered to be the ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... Ill. , July 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... (SNA™) constructs as gene regulatory and immunotherapeutic ... has joined AuraSense Therapeutics, executive leadership ... 11. Prior to joining AuraSense ... and Chief Financial Officer of Cellular Dynamics ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... 23, 2014  Having the right people at the ... accelerating business growth and achieving clinical and operational goals. ... Leadership Summit, July 20-22, 2014, in San ... executives and healthcare experts discussing how partnerships have positively ... President & Chief Executive Officer of Cape Regional Medical ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... Israel , July 23, 2014 ... a portfolio company of Trendlines Agtech , ... of Israel,s leading agricultural ... , Valentis,s technology combines nanocrystalline cellulose ... pulp waste, with additional nanoparticles to produce highly ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals 2Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals 3Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals 4AuraSense Therapeutics Appoints Biotechnology Veteran David S. Snyder as Chief Financial Officer 2MSC and Cape Regional Medical Center Partner to Improve Cost, Quality and Outcomes 2Valentis Nanotech Signs MOU to Integrate Technology in Thermoplastics Production 2
Cached News: