HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
To stop evolution: New way of fighting antibiotic resistance demonstrated by Scripps scientists

A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the University of Wisconsin have demonstrated a new way of fighting antibiotic resistance: by stopping evolution.

In the June issue of the open-access journal PloS Biology, the team describes how a protein called LexA in the bacterium Escherichia coli promotes mutations and helps the pathogen evolve resistance to antibiotics. The scientists also show that E. coli evolution could be halted in its tracks by subjecting the bacteria to compounds that block LexA. Interfering with this protein renders the bacteria unable to evolve resistance to the common antibiotics ciprofloxacin and rifampicin.

"If you inhibit this pathway, the bacteria cannot evolve," says Scripps Research Assistant Professor Floyd Romesberg, Ph.D., who led the study.

Since the evolution of resistance is under the control of LexA, compounds that block the protein might prolong the potency of existing antibiotics.

Evolution -- Its not Like Death and Taxes Anymore

This research raises fundamental questions about evolution. Biologists have often thought about evolution in the same way many think about death and taxes -- something inevitable. But Romesberg is a chemist, and he found himself asking not only how, but why evolution happens.

For the last few years, Romesberg has led an effort to understand the genes that drive evolution, an innovative way of thinking because scientists have more often understood evolution as the force that drives genes. What underlies evolution is mutation -- changes in the DNA. "Mutations are the fuel for evolution," says Romesberg.

Because of the potential harm of mutations, humans and other mammals have evolved to make as few as possible. The machinery inside our cells has the ability to replicate our genomes extremely well, and the "polymerase" enzymes that replicate our DNA rarely make
'"/>

Contact: Jason Bardi
jasonb@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute
18-May-2005


Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6

Related biology news :

1. Bony vertebrate evolution: Elephant sharks closer to humans than teleost fish
2. Parallel evolution: Proteins do it, too
3. Neuroblastoma expert reviews progress and challenges in fighting difficult pediatric cancer
4. Plant pathologists fighting global threat to wheat supply
5. Nutrients in certain vegetables may provide cancer-fighting benefit
6. Nanotextured implant materials: blending in, not fighting back
7. These legs were made for fighting
8. Making daughters different -- how immune cells take divergent paths when fighting infections
9. Unique tomatoes tops in disease-fighting antioxidants
10. Exercise pivotal in preventing and fighting type II diabetes
11. Targeting tau: Inflammation study suggests new approach for fighting Alzheimers

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/30/2014)... a $1.04 million grant from the U.S. Army ... osteoarthritis using a patient,s own stem cells, spurred ... polymers., Liping Tang, a bioengineering professor and interim ... is primarily focused on helping soldiers who are ... if we inject microscaffolding that we,ve developed into ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... North Carolina State University researchers have developed a suite ... between dogs and humans, which has applications in everything ... our pets. , "We,ve developed a platform for computer-mediated ... to new avenues for interpreting dogs, behavioral signals and ... Dr. David Roberts, an assistant professor of computer science ...
(Date:10/29/2014)... In the largest study of its kind to date, ... genes that heighten the risk for autism. Joseph Buxbaum, ... York City, Mark Daly, Ph.D., Broad Institute of Harvard ... DNA samples from affected children, parents and unrelated people. ... to contribute to the risk for autism spectrum disorder ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):UTA researcher uses microscaffolding injections to mend cartilage, prevent osteoarthritis 2New tech aims to improve communication between dogs and humans 2
(Date:10/31/2014)... The report "Dairy Alternative (Beverage) ... Flavored, Sweetened, Unsweetened), Channel (Supermarket, Health Store, Pharmacy, ... Forecast to 2018," defines and segments the dairy ... of revenue and volume for plant-based dairy alternative ... reach $14 Billion by 2018 with the Asia-Pacific ...
(Date:10/31/2014)... ORLANDO, Fla. , Oct. 31, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... firm owned by Tavistock Group, celebrated the groundbreaking of ... Nona Medical City. The 92,000-square-foot, ... Central Florida designed specifically ... Located in the heart of the 650-acre Lake ...
(Date:10/30/2014)...  Ardelyx, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARDX ), ... and metabolic diseases, today announced that it will ... November 6, 2014. Following the announcement, the Ardelyx ... and webcast at 4:30pm ET to review the ... The live webcast can be accessed ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... BOSTON, MA (PRWEB) October 30, 2014 ... communication and collaboration provider, offers Office 365 end ... software into a complete phone system by adding ... Office 365 (O365) includes Lync Online, a communication ... to Lync calls. With hosted voice, O365 becomes ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Dairy Alternative Beverage Market Projected to Reach $14 Billion by 2018 - Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Dairy Alternative Beverage Market Projected to Reach $14 Billion by 2018 - Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Dairy Alternative Beverage Market Projected to Reach $14 Billion by 2018 - Report by MarketsandMarkets 4GuideWell Innovation Center Groundbreaking Hosted by Tavistock Development Company at Lake Nona Medical City 2GuideWell Innovation Center Groundbreaking Hosted by Tavistock Development Company at Lake Nona Medical City 3Ardelyx to Report Third Quarter 2014 Financial Results on November 6, 2014 2SoundConnect Launches Voice Enablement and Hybrid Audio Conferencing for Office 365 2SoundConnect Launches Voice Enablement and Hybrid Audio Conferencing for Office 365 3
Cached News: