HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
U of T researcher links schizophrenia, gene mutations

The supersensitivity to dopamine that is characteristic of schizophrenia can be caused by mutations to a wide variety of genes, rather than alterations to just two or three specific genes, says a University of Toronto researcher.

In research published in the Feb. 15 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Toronto pharmacology professor Philip Seeman and his 16 colleagues in eight universities show that mutations to genes that have no relation to the brain's dopamine receptors can still cause those receptors to become highly sensitive to their own dopamine, a condition that leads to psychosis.

By examining brain tissue from mice with various gene mutations, the researchers determined that the brain appears to compensate for the altered gene by becoming supersensitive to dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that allows people to move, think and feel.

"The altered genes may provoke the brain to respond and compensate, and compensation often involves the dopamine system going into high gear," says Seeman. "The brain knows about mistakes, and to protect itself, it makes sense for the compensation to re-adjust the dopamine system to preserve the functions such as movement and thought that the body and brain needs."

An excessively active dopamine system can trigger the hallucinations and delusions experienced in schizophrenia, amphetamine drug abuse or Alzheimer's disease. In drug abuse, the reaction is temporary; in schizophrenia, it recurs.

"This research brings together two worlds: the psychosis of drug abuse and schizophrenia," says Seeman. "There's a common denominator based on the dopamine receptor."

It also offers a new direction for research into schizophrenia.

"Vast amounts of money are being spent to look for the magical two or three genes that cause psychosis but it could be many genes and that includes genes that have nothing to do with dopamine," said S
'"/>

Contact: Philip Seeman
philip.seeman@utoronto.ca
416-978-4891
University of Toronto
14-Feb-2005


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Innovative tagging technique may help researchers better protect fish stocks
2. Penn researchers discover how key protein stops inflammation
3. ASU researchers partner with UOP to make biofuel for military jets a reality
4. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
5. Penn researchers discover pathway that eliminates genetic defects in red blood cells
6. U-M researchers find family of on switches that cause prostate cancer
7. 2007 EURYI: 20 young researchers to receive Nobel Prize-sized awards for breakthrough ideas
8. Pets could be source of multiresistant bacteria infections in humans, MU researchers investigate
9. MGH researchers confirm that bone marrow restores fertility in female mice
10. Smithsonians National Zoo researchers use electronic eggs to help save threatened species
11. U-M researchers identify gene involved in breast cancer

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/4/2019)... FORT WORTH, Texas (PRWEB) , ... January 02, ... ... 2019 catalog. This release is particularly noteworthy, as the life science tools and ... company’s history, it is offering a catalog. The catalog features not just part ...
(Date:12/25/2018)... ... December 24, 2018 , ... Researchers at ... discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept known as “blacklisting,” which ... files and messages. Using blacklisting as a filter to single out genetic variations ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... December 19, 2018 , ... ... of a new study in Arthroscopy evaluating the use of novel ... cuff tears (RCTs). These tears represent a painful, disabling condition for which there ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/4/2019)... ... January 02, 2019 , ... ... precancer and cancer cells in blood, has been named as a partner in ... biotech company developing cell therapies for cancer treatment, will use CellMax Life’s circulating ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... ... December 19, 2018 , ... ... first rate Stem Cell Training Course in Las Vegas. Training includes facial rejuvenation, ... procedures explode in popularity nationwide for aesthetics, having the training from expert, Board ...
(Date:12/18/2018)... ... December 18, 2018 , ... ... optimization firm for the life sciences industry, unveiled a completely redesigned website at ... a more user-friendly browsing experience for their valued clients and business partners. ...
(Date:12/13/2018)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... December 11, 2018 , ... ... biosensor that doctors and nurses can use to quickly detect Clostridium difficile (C. ... be the heart of a handheld device that can be used onsite in ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: