HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
UCI scientists use near real-time sensor data to detect coastal ocean pollution

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 18, 2006 -- A discovery by UC Irvine scientists could help public health officials know instantly when pollution has moved into the coastal ocean -- a breakthrough that could enable authorities to post warnings or close beaches in minutes rather than days.

The new technique analyzes temperature and salinity data collected by sensors located in the water along the Southern California coast. Researchers found that fluctuations in the sensor data correlate with changes in water quality as soon as they occur. This type of analysis may lead to detection methods that are far faster than the current method of physically collecting water and testing it in a lab.

"Decisions to post a warning or close a beach are currently made one to three days after a sample is collected. This would be fine if you were testing water that sits in a tub, but ocean currents are highly dynamic, and water quality varies hour by hour and minute to minute," said Stanley B. Grant, professor of chemical engineering and materials science at UCI. "Our research shows that near real-time sensor data can be used to detect changes in the state of the coastal ocean -- information that could, in concert with traditional monitoring data and new ocean observing systems, eventually result in the creation of an up-to-the-minute water-quality report accessible by the public on the Internet."

Grant, along with Brett F. Sanders, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, and graduate student Youngsul Jeong published their research in the current online issue of Environmental Science and Technology.

Coastal ocean observing systems -- devices that use technology to sense environmental conditions -- collect large amounts of data such as temperature, salinity and water level. The data is streamed in near real-time via the Internet for scientists and coastal managers to process and interpret.

These sensors cannot measure bacteri
'"/>

Contact: Jennifer Fitzenberger
jfitzen@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine
18-Sep-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
2. Smithsonian scientists show differing patterns of rainforest biodiversity
3. Weizmann Institute scientists discover a control mechanism for metastasis
4. Cornell scientists link E. coli bacteria to Crohns disease
5. UCLA scientists produce functioning neurons from human embryonic stem cells
6. ASBMB taps 8 scientists and 1 politician for top awards
7. UF, French scientists seek test to detect gene doping in athletes
8. In a first, Einstein scientists discover the dynamics of transcription in living mammalian cells
9. Forsyth scientists gain new understanding of adult stem cell regulation
10. Nanotechnology helps scientists make bendy sensors for hydrogen vehicles
11. After a decades-long search, scientists identify new genetic risk factors for multiple sclerosis

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/30/2016)... FRANCISCO and WARSAW, Poland , Nov. 30, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... It is one of the most crucial aspects of recovery so we need to ... of serious health risks, including heart problems, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, and even ... and friends sleep and find a Christmas present that could help them to manage ... ...
(Date:11/29/2016)... Nov. 29, 2016   Neurotechnology , ... object recognition technologies, today released FingerCell 3.0, ... recognition solutions that run on low-power, low-memory ... using less than 128KB of memory, enabling ... that have limited on-board resources, such as: ...
(Date:11/24/2016)... -- Cercacor today introduced Ember TM Sport Premium ... measure hemoglobin, Oxygen Content, Oxygen Saturation, Perfusion Index, ... approximately 30 seconds. Smaller than a smartphone, using only ... key data about their bodies to help monitor these ... Hemoglobin carries oxygen to muscles. When hemoglobin and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... SAN DIEGO , Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... treatments for congestive heart failure and type 2 ... license for a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector ... Kay , M.D., Ph.D., at Stanford University. The ... of its paracrine gene therapy product pipeline. ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... 8, 2016 Oxford Gene Technology ... SureSeqâ„¢ NGS panel range with the launch of the SureSeq ... study of variants in familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). The panel delivers ... on a single small panel and allows customisation by ,mix ... all exons for LDLR , P C ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... This CAST ... approvals for biotech crops. The authors focus on the economic effects in countries that ... approval of new biotech crops and the resultant risk of low level presence (LLP) ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... SEOUL, South Korea , Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... completed a $21 billion KRW (US $18.9M) Series A ... Management, Kolon Investment, G.N. Tech Venture and SNU Bio ... by Eutilex to 30.5 billion KRW (US $27.7M) since ... will help Eutilex to bolster the development and commercialization ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: