HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
UCSB researchers discover new biotechnology to identify and engineer substrates for proteases

Santa Barbara, California May 1 , 2006 Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have developed a new biotechnology that enables scientists to identify and engineer protease substrates, giving them the means of crafting pharmaceuticals to outsmart disease. Their work, authored by Patrick Daugherty, an assistant professor of Chemical Engineering, and Kevin Boulware, a PhD candidate, are published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Proteases (or peptidases) are encoded by about two percent of genes in the human genome and play key roles in nearly all diseases. They act as "molecular scissors" by attaching to specific sequences contained within other proteins, called substrates, and cutting them in specific locations. For example, proteases are responsible for digesting food, for determining the proper time for cells to die, and for removing damaged proteins from the body.

But the substrates for most proteases are unknown, and this has limited researchers' ability to facilitate or thwart protease action. By identifying substrates, scientists gain the ability to regulate protein function, creating the capacity to speed up, slow down or eliminate particular protease actions. Daugherty's approach also makes it easier to measure protease action and thus develop pharmaceuticals that control protease activity.

Daugherty and Boulware developed a general combinatorial approach to identify optimal substrates of proteases, using quantitative kinetic screening of cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS). The results suggest that CLiPS will be broadly useful for characterizing proteases and developing optimal substrates for therapeutic applications.

Of the roughly 1,000 proteases in the human genome, only about ten percent of the targets have been identified, but Daugherty believes that scientists will identify nearly all of them in the next five to ten years. "This technology will give us a scalable tool that wi
'"/>

Contact: Barbara B. Gray
bbgray@engineering.ucsb.edu
818-889-5415
University of California - Santa Barbara
1-May-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Innovative tagging technique may help researchers better protect fish stocks
2. Penn researchers discover how key protein stops inflammation
3. ASU researchers partner with UOP to make biofuel for military jets a reality
4. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
5. Penn researchers discover pathway that eliminates genetic defects in red blood cells
6. U-M researchers find family of on switches that cause prostate cancer
7. 2007 EURYI: 20 young researchers to receive Nobel Prize-sized awards for breakthrough ideas
8. Pets could be source of multiresistant bacteria infections in humans, MU researchers investigate
9. MGH researchers confirm that bone marrow restores fertility in female mice
10. Smithsonians National Zoo researchers use electronic eggs to help save threatened species
11. U-M researchers identify gene involved in breast cancer

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/18/2020)... TORONTO (PRWEB) , ... July 17, 2020 , ... Commercial ... hangs on pharma’s ability to discover a COVID cure or vaccine, the global economic ... competitive and price pressure is not going away and capturing full value from every ...
(Date:7/2/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... July 02, ... ... Biology Systems, B.V. (MBS) has announced a publication detailing the use of ... reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 16 minutes. The article, titled ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... ... June 24, 2020 , ... ... software-driven clinical data services that accelerate drug development, is collaborating with Karyopharm Therapeutics ... inhibitor, in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. This is the first study of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... July 29, 2020 , ... ... solutions today announced the launch of its new tagline, “BUILDING FOR LIFE.” The ... biopharmaceutical industry and around the globe, requiring fast track capacity to provide patients ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 29, 2020 , ... The SDX® Respiratory Gating ... countries, has reached its 20th anniversary of worldwide use. Introduced in the US ... universities including University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Maryland, University of ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... , ... July 16, 2020 , ... ... to aid in the early detection and prevention of high-burden diseases, and Centric ... US-based hospitals and healthcare organizations to utilize existing data in order to identify ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... LEXINGTON, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... July 09, 2020 ... ... novel approaches to cell therapy, today announced the hiring of Allen R. Nissenson, ... executive team and oversee the clinical development of Sentien’s lead product, SBI-101. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: