HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
US control strategies may make flu epidemics worse, UCLA study shows

Regular as clockwork, the flu arrives every year. And, according to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5 to 20 percent of the U.S. population on average will come down with it. About 36,000 people will die.

But among health experts, a bigger concern than the seasonal flu is an outright flu pandemic, such as a human strain of avian flu. And officials say it is not a question of if such a health crisis will come but when. Are we prepared? In a word, say three UCLA researchers, no.

In a report to be published in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS Computational Biology and currently available online, Sally Blower, a professor at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and Romulus Breban and Raffaele Vardavas, postdoctoral fellows in Blowers research group, used novel mathematical modeling techniques to predict that current health policy based on voluntary vaccinations is not adequate to control severe flu epidemics and pandemics unless vaccination programs offer incentives to individuals.

According to the researchers, the severity of such a health crisis could be reduced if programs were to provide several years of free vaccinations to individuals who pay for only one year. Interestingly, however, some incentive programs could have the opposite effect. Providing free vaccinations for entire families, for example, could actually increase the frequency of severe epidemics. This is because when the head of the household makes a choice flu shots or no flu shots on behalf of all the other household members, there is no individual decision-making, and adaptability is decreased.

While other models have determined what proportion of the population would need to be vaccinated in order to prevent a pandemic, none of these models have shown whether this critical coverage can actually be reached. What has been missing, according to Blower, a mathematical and evolutionary biologist, is the hum
'"/>

Contact: Mark Wheeler
mwheeler@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2265
University of California - Los Angeles
3-May-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Circadian clock controls plant growth hormone
2. Weizmann Institute scientists discover a control mechanism for metastasis
3. Researchers find pathway that controls cell size and division
4. Penn researchers discover how microRNAs control protein synthesis
5. Biocontrol of invasive water hyacinth contributes to socioeconomic and health improvements in Africa
6. Amoebae control cheating by keeping it in the family
7. Revealed -- Mosquito genes that could be controlling the spread of killer viruses
8. Autism-related proteins control nerve excitability, researchers find
9. Weizmann Institute scientists develop a general control switch for protein activity
10. Researchers demonstrate way to control tree height
11. Hot on the TRAIL of controlling inflammation in bacterial meningitis

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/30/2019)... ... September 30, 2019 , ... ... the capacity of life science organizations to accelerate innovation and maximize productivity, announces ... October 4th. , What: Just 30 days to 21 CFR Part 11 compliance ...
(Date:9/25/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... September 25, 2019 , ... ... in Austin, TX, have placed over 20,000 dental implants for a variety of ... highly technical zygomatic and pterygoid dental implants. Dental implants offer patients ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 23, 2019 , ... Global molecular diagnostics ... that Holotype HLA and other Omixon products will be featured among 10 posters ... for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ASHI) in Pittsburgh, PA. Omixon’s Lunch Symposium on ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 24, 2019 , ... ... latest research in the area of high-level X-ray methods using synchrotron-produced X-rays ... COO of Improved Pharma, will present “Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction and Pair Distribution ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... , ... September 24, 2019 , ... ... Hannah Holscher, PhD, RD, to its Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Holscher is an ... and the Division of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 17, 2019 , ... Tucker, a Labrador retriever, was just a ... Tucker was limping and lame on his right hip and elbow. At one year ... called “the worst case the vet had seen.” He was prescribed pain medications, both ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 16, 2019 , ... ... CNBC on Saturday, September 21st @11:00am ET. Check local listings for more information ... (Credo Biomedical), a molecular diagnostic company from Singapore dedicated to developing advanced ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: