HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Under magnetic force, nanoparticles may deliver gene therapy

After binding DNA segments to tiny iron-containing spheres called nanoparticles, researchers have used magnetic fields to direct the nanoparticles into arterial muscle cells, where the DNA could have a therapeutic effect. Although the research, done in cell cultures, is in early stages, it may represent a new method for delivering gene therapy to benefit blood vessels damaged by arterial disease.

The nanoparticles are extremely small, ranging from 185 to 375 nanometers (a nanometer is one billionth of a meter, or a millionth of a millimeter). For comparison, red blood cells are ten to 100 times larger. The researchers were able to control the nanoparticle size by varying the amount or composition of solvents they used to form the nanoparticles.

The magnetically driven delivery system also may find broader use as a vehicle for delivering drugs, genes or cells to a target organ. This is a novel delivery system, the first to use a biodegradable, magnetically driven polymer to achieve clinically relevant effects, said study leader Robert J. Levy, M.D., the William J. Rashkind Chair of Pediatric Cardiology at The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia. This system has the potential to be a powerful tool.

The proof-of-principle study, performed on vascular cells in culture, appears in the August issue of the FASEB Journal, published by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

Impregnated with iron oxide, the nanoparticles carry a surface coating of DNA bound to an organic compound called polyethylenimine (PEI). The PEI protected the DNA from being broken down by enzymes called endonucleases that were present in the cell cultures and which occur normally in the bloodstream.

The DNA was in the form of a plasmid, a circular molecule that here carried a gene that coded for a growth-inhibiting protein called adiponectin. By applying a magnetic field, the study team steered the particles into arterial smooth
'"/>

Contact: John Ascenzi
Ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
31-Jul-2007


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Undergraduate research shows leaderless honeybee organizing
2. Understanding why C. difficile causes disease -- its hungry
3. Understanding the global carbon budget -- Woods Hole Research Center expert provides insights
4. Understanding occupational safety and health issues of nanotechnology
5. Merck and AAAS announce 2007 winners of Outstanding Undergraduate Research Programs
6. Understanding the Arctic -- NSF-funded expeditions cover new ground in climate science
7. Underground air might cause DNA damage
8. Understanding climate change: Public forum in Philadelphia next week
9. Understanding food nutrition labels challenging for many people
10. Underwater robots work together without human input
11. Under certain genetic circumstances, naltrexone may increase the urge to drink

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/7/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... August 07, 2018 , ... CallTower ... today their new CT Cloud Voice and SIP solutions. CT Cloud solutions are ... secure, quality voice solution that is far superior to traditional PBX systems, at a ...
(Date:8/1/2018)... ... August 01, 2018 , ... Dr. Asher Kimchi, Founder ... winning recipients of the 2018 IAC Awards at the 23rd World Congress on Heart ... also named four faculty to receive the Distinguished Fellowship Awards. , Dr. Asher Kimchi, ...
(Date:8/1/2018)... , ... August 01, 2018 , ... Visikol CEO Dr. ... services and strong pharmaceutical company partnerships that Visikol will far exceed its original 2018 ... developing its suite of digital pathology tools, whole mount imaging ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/9/2018)... ... August 08, 2018 , ... ... was developed and is continually updated by a talented scientific team that includes ... service provides: , 1. Information on the medical impact of a patient’s ...
(Date:8/9/2018)... ... August 09, 2018 , ... Simpson ... construction (AEC) experts with building owners and managers for a full-day discussion on ... Construct symposium comes to Boston for the first time on Thursday, 13 September ...
(Date:7/31/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... July 31, 2018 , ... ... 2 additional CE/IVD marked molecular quality controls to its expanding CE/IVD product inventory. ... controls to our expanding CE/IVD QC offerings. ZeptoMetrix remains entirely committed to fully ...
(Date:7/25/2018)... ... July 25, 2018 , ... Dimitrius Anagnos, an evidence-based ... combat inflammation and autoimmune disorders. , The preclinical research assessed biomarkers for ... was reported:, Over 70% decrease in Interleukin (IL-1ß) ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: