HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Undesirable expatriates: Preventing the spread of invasive animals

pproximately $19 billion dollars worth of damages annually in the U.S. (Pimentel et al. 2000. BioScience 50, 53).

The authors' exhaustive analysis, which drew on data from the 15th century to the 20th century, revealed an unsettling conclusion. For every four animals that made the transatlantic journey, one became invasive. Jeschke notes, "Our data indicate that once introduced, vertebrates have a 25% chance of becoming invasive. This figure, which appears to be true for other animals as well, is significantly higher than the 1% probability that dominates invasive species risk assessment. The 1% probability is based on plant invasions. Introduced animals do not act like introduced plants-- they appear to have a much higher invasion success rate."

Given that humans are the primary vehicles for transporting animals across the ocean, it's not surprising that animal introduction patterns between Europe and North America mirror immigration patterns. Overall, a higher proportion of European animals entered North America than vice-versa, with introductions peaking in the 19th century and decreasing thereafter. This decline can be attributed to a reduction in immigration following WWI and increased U.S. regulations on wildlife imports.

Conversely, North American introductions to Europe have been on the rise throughout the 20th century as more Americans immigrate to European countries. In many parts of Europe, regulations on imported wildlife are not as strict as the U.S. and Canada. Canadian goose, gray squirrel, and northern cottontails already populate the European countryside. In the absence of precautions, Jeschke speculates that North American animal introductions may become more common.

The bottom line-- vertebrate animals have a high rate of invasion success. Once established, they can act as biological pollutants that result in ecological and economic damages. "The best way to combat invasive species is to prevent them from being in
'"/>

Contact: Lori M. Quillen
quillenl@ecostudies.org
845-677-7600 x321
Institute of Ecosystem Studies
18-Apr-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Preventing and treating lung cancer -- ESMO explores collaboration to fight cancer on all fronts
2. Preventing cancer without killing cells
3. Preventing obesity in children -- research highlights physical activity levels
4. Preventing graft-versus-host disease disease after bone marrow transplant -- without toxicity
5. Preventing ventilation induced lung injury depends on giving the right number of sighs
6. Preventing bacterial biofilms could help fight TB
7. Preventing fetal exposure to popular acne drug
8. Preventing a pandemic: Study suggests strategies for containing a flu outbreak
9. Size matters: Preventing large mammal extinction
10. Preventing muscle atrophy
11. Preventing SCD1 expression prevents obesity

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/30/2014)... soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according ... by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues. , ... to continually measure the fluctuations of both carbon ... in the journal by Global Change ... organic soils has resulted in vast soil subsidence ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... 2014 – Bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract fulfill ... Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory ... the gut and enter the bloodstream. , Although ... the body, chronic or systemic inflammation is linked ... established the involvement of inflammatory processes in the ...
(Date:10/29/2014)... a consequence of chemotherapy will benefit from a major ... that prevents hair loss. , The research is being ... cooling manufacturing company, Paxman Coolers, of Fenay Bridge, Huddersfield, ... of Huddersfield. , The research will be led by ... the pharmacology of cancer treatment, which he will use ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Dartmouth study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions 2Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics 2New technology on the way to aid cancer suffers who lose their hair after chemotherapy 2
(Date:10/31/2014)... 31, 2014 Having access to safe ... uphill battle in many corners of the globe. It’s ... community in northwestern Bolivia where many have been sickened ... from Fairfield University’s School of Engineering has been working ... Campesina (UAC), “the united college for the peasants.” A ...
(Date:10/31/2014)... Burlington, MA (PRWEB) October 31, 2014 ... is hosting a free learning webinar to introduce its ... managers, standards directors and biostatisticians. , Launched in September, ... the company's suite of clinical trial automation tools. For ... in a web browser. And by introducing Formations – ...
(Date:10/31/2014)... (PRWEB) October 31, 2014 Stronger ... healthcare, construction, finance and consumer electronics will help ... reason, industry research firm IBISWorld has added a ... its growing industry report collection. , The Biometrics ... for biometric technologies such as fingerprint, iris, retina ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... 30, 2014  Ardelyx, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... cardio-renal, gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases, today announced that ... on Thursday, November 6, 2014. Following the announcement, ... conference call and webcast at 4:30pm ET to ... business update. The live webcast can ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Fairfield University School of Engineering project reduces illness in rural community 2Fairfield University School of Engineering project reduces illness in rural community 3Formedix to Introduce "Revolutionary" Clinical Trial Automation Software with Learning Webinar 2Biometrics Scan Software in the US Industry Market Research Report Now Available from IBISWorld 2Biometrics Scan Software in the US Industry Market Research Report Now Available from IBISWorld 3Ardelyx to Report Third Quarter 2014 Financial Results on November 6, 2014 2
Cached News: