HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Vaccinating wildlife can reduce human risk for Lyme disease

Direct field evidence shows that Lyme disease in humans can be prevented by vaccinating wildlife, researchers in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale School of Medicine report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In a four-year study of isolated woodlands near New Haven, nearly 1,000 white-footed mice were trapped and either vaccinated against Lyme disease or given a placebo. Fewer deer ticks tested positive for Lyme disease in the experimental plots where mice had been vaccinated. Fewer ticks carrying infection reduced the risk for humans getting Lyme disease from a tick bite.

"Vaccinating wildlife increases our prevention options," said principal investigator Durland Fish, professor of epidemiology at Yale, who led the study with Jean Tsao, now at Michigan State University and microbiologist Alan Barbour at University of California at Irvine. "Despite a record increase in cases, efforts to prevent Lyme disease with a human vaccine were set back in 2002 when it was pulled from the market due to poor sales."

Although the study showed significant reduction in risk and was the first demonstration of a wildlife vaccination effect for any vector-borne disease, the reduction was not as great as the investigators had hoped.

A surprising result was that mice are not as important in maintaining the Lyme disease bacterium in nature as previous studies showed. "If only mice were responsible for infecting the ticks, we would have seen a much greater reduction," Fish explained. "We now believe that mice are responsible for only 27 to 55 percent of the infection found in ticks. This changes our view on how Lyme disease is circulated between wildlife and ticks."

Fish said that in addition to mice, other animals must receive Lyme disease vaccination in order to further reduce risk to humans. Oral vaccines, similar
'"/>

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University
13-Dec-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. The new wildlife refuge -- Golf courses?
2. Manipulating nature: Scientists query wildlife birth-control method
3. Study questions the biodiversity hotspot approach to wildlife conservation
4. Research highlights how farmers agri-environment schemes could do more for wildlife
5. High-tech equipment may help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions
6. Moving wildlife detrimental to oral rabies vaccination project
7. UGA researchers find that hunting can increase the severity of wildlife disease epidemics
8. Report: Canadas Yellowstone too small for wildlife
9. Afghanistan to protect wildlife and wild lands
10. Test for dioxin sensitivity in wildlife could result from new study
11. Monkey-dung study offers clues about land-use, wildlife ecology

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Vaccinating wildlife can reduce human risk for Lyme disease

(Date:10/14/2014)... – October 14, 2014 – Scientists from The Scripps ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to lead an ... hemorrhagic fever disease in Africa. The study aims to ... some patients die, while others survive the inflection. ... the basic mechanism of how Lassa fever virus causes ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... international team of researchers, led by the Chinese Academy ... Nature Genetics a brief genomic history of ... the tomato plant. , The C.M. Rick Tomato Genetics ... in this study by providing seed of both cultivated ... which builds on the first tomato genome sequence completed ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... – Over the past decades, we have seen numerous ... the needs of infants for social contact and stimulation ... thrive. , Infancy and childhood are critical ... A generation of research suggests that enriched environments, full ... cognitive function. In contrast, deprivation and stress may compromise ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Scripps Research Institute team receives $6.6 million to investigate deadly Lassa virus 2Institutional rearing may increase risk attention-deficit disorder 2
(Date:10/18/2014)... October 18, 2014 The Asian arthroscopic ... Asia with analysis and forecast of revenue. The arthroscopic ... $712.3 million by 2018, at a CAGR of 6.5% ... of the Asian arthroscopic devices market, to get an ... a glimpse of the segmentation of arthroscopic devices market ...
(Date:10/18/2014)... NY (PRWEB) October 18, 2014 The ... healthy rate in the five years to 2014. The ... federal renewable energy tax credits that encouraged the use ... enacted renewable portfolio standards (RPSs), which require local utilities ... of their total energy portfolio. Increased campaigning for green ...
(Date:10/17/2014)... engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office ... at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide ... professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new ... than taking X-rays of an aircraft,s wing., "We,ll be ... when we look at it on this scale," Huang ...
(Date:10/17/2014)... October 17, 2014 Bioquell, provider ... upon by health facilities around the world to ... being treated. Among the many places the hydrogen ... Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and at the National ... vapor-producing robots have been utilized to decontaminate patient ...
Breaking Biology Technology:The Asian arthroscopic devices market is estimated to grow to $712.3 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Asian arthroscopic devices market is estimated to grow to $712.3 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3The Asian arthroscopic devices market is estimated to grow to $712.3 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 4Biomass Power in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld Has Been Updated 2Biomass Power in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld Has Been Updated 3UT Arlington project to detect possible damages in aircraft parts early in process 2Bioquell’s Vapor Producing Robots Selected to Combat Ebola in Hospitals Around the World 2Bioquell’s Vapor Producing Robots Selected to Combat Ebola in Hospitals Around the World 3Bioquell’s Vapor Producing Robots Selected to Combat Ebola in Hospitals Around the World 4Bioquell’s Vapor Producing Robots Selected to Combat Ebola in Hospitals Around the World 5Bioquell’s Vapor Producing Robots Selected to Combat Ebola in Hospitals Around the World 6
Cached News: