HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Vaccinating wildlife can reduce human risk for Lyme disease

Direct field evidence shows that Lyme disease in humans can be prevented by vaccinating wildlife, researchers in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale School of Medicine report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In a four-year study of isolated woodlands near New Haven, nearly 1,000 white-footed mice were trapped and either vaccinated against Lyme disease or given a placebo. Fewer deer ticks tested positive for Lyme disease in the experimental plots where mice had been vaccinated. Fewer ticks carrying infection reduced the risk for humans getting Lyme disease from a tick bite.

"Vaccinating wildlife increases our prevention options," said principal investigator Durland Fish, professor of epidemiology at Yale, who led the study with Jean Tsao, now at Michigan State University and microbiologist Alan Barbour at University of California at Irvine. "Despite a record increase in cases, efforts to prevent Lyme disease with a human vaccine were set back in 2002 when it was pulled from the market due to poor sales."

Although the study showed significant reduction in risk and was the first demonstration of a wildlife vaccination effect for any vector-borne disease, the reduction was not as great as the investigators had hoped.

A surprising result was that mice are not as important in maintaining the Lyme disease bacterium in nature as previous studies showed. "If only mice were responsible for infecting the ticks, we would have seen a much greater reduction," Fish explained. "We now believe that mice are responsible for only 27 to 55 percent of the infection found in ticks. This changes our view on how Lyme disease is circulated between wildlife and ticks."

Fish said that in addition to mice, other animals must receive Lyme disease vaccination in order to further reduce risk to humans. Oral vaccines, similar
'"/>

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University
13-Dec-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. The new wildlife refuge -- Golf courses?
2. Manipulating nature: Scientists query wildlife birth-control method
3. Study questions the biodiversity hotspot approach to wildlife conservation
4. Research highlights how farmers agri-environment schemes could do more for wildlife
5. High-tech equipment may help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions
6. Moving wildlife detrimental to oral rabies vaccination project
7. UGA researchers find that hunting can increase the severity of wildlife disease epidemics
8. Report: Canadas Yellowstone too small for wildlife
9. Afghanistan to protect wildlife and wild lands
10. Test for dioxin sensitivity in wildlife could result from new study
11. Monkey-dung study offers clues about land-use, wildlife ecology

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Vaccinating wildlife can reduce human risk for Lyme disease

(Date:4/17/2014)... and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and ... do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations ... researchers., The invasive pests include including Nosema microsporidia ... honeybees appear to be resilient to these invasive pests, ... control pests in Europe, Asia and the United States ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Current Biology on April 17 have discovered ... Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species ... example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. , ... animals, Neotrogla is the only example in ... Yoshizawa from Hokkaido University in Japan. , During copulation, ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system ... aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. ... have the immunological equivalent of "neighborhood police" specialized ... single organ, instead of an entire city, the body. ... St. Louis have shown that the liver, skin and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 2East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 3In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises 2Some immune cells defend only 1 organ 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... SAN JOSE, California , January 15, 2014 ... antibody-drug conjugates for cancer, today announced the appointment of Thomas ... Reynolds has over 20 years, development experience gained in the ... Genetics. "I am delighted to welcome Tom at ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 This webinar ... nonclinical and clinical safety assessment in biosimilars. , Regulatory ... for biosimilar drug development, however the complex nature of ... quality, safety and efficacy extremely challenging. Based on the ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 More than 5 ... about 1 in 3 seniors will die with Alzheimer’s ... These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans into looking ... help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. Jonathan Weisman, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA theory explains ... these latent viruses is the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), and ... (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the body’s ... RA patients have high concentrations of EBV DNA in their ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 3Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3
Cached News: