HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Viral protein helps infected T cells stick to uninfected cells

COLUMBUS , Ohio New research shows that a protein made by a cancer virus causes infected immune cells to cling to other immune cells, enabling the virus to spread.

The virus, the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is transmitted mainly when infected cells known as T lymphocytes, or T cells, touch uninfected T cells.

The finding helps explain how this cell-to-cell transmission happens. It suggests that an HTLV-1 protein known as p12 activates infected T cells and causes them to become sticky and adhere to other T cells.

The greater stickiness happens because the p12 viral protein causes special adherence proteins found on the surface of T cells to cluster in large groups something that normally happens when T cells touch to communicate with one another during an immune response.

The findings also suggest that a drug that inhibits the p12 protein might also help prevent HTLV-1 transmission.

The research, published in the May issue of the Journal of Immunology, was led by scientists with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center and the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine.

"This study indicates that the p12 protein plays an important role in programming infected cells for cell-to-cell transmission," says principal investigator Michael D. Lairmore, professor and chair of veterinary biosciences and a member of the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"It shows that this virus takes advantage of something that T cells do normally, but, in this case, the virus is stimulating the interaction with other T cells rather than a normal immune response."

HTLV-1 infects an estimated 15 to 25 million people worldwide. About 5 percent of those infected develop adult T cell leukemia or lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive disease characterized by a long latent period and the proliferation of T cells. The infected cells are spread from person to person during sexual activity and by blood and breast mil
'"/>

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University
20-Apr-2006


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Viral enzyme recruited in fight against ear infection
2. Viral protein is an effective preventative against infection
3. Viral marker of human migration suspect
4. Viral oncoprotein inactivation of p53
5. Viral genetic differences are possible key to HIV dementia
6. Viral hitchhiker inhibits Wolbachia bacterias ability to proliferate
7. Viral fitness explains different resistance patterns to aids drugs
8. Viral protein influences key cell-signaling pathway
9. Penn researchers discover how key protein stops inflammation
10. UCF research links proteins, stem cells and potential Alzheimers treatment
11. Teamwork between 2 key proteins necessary for normal development and regulation of red blood cells

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/9/2019)... ... November 08, 2019 , ... StageBio ... histology, pathology, biomarker development, and archiving services for the biopharmaceutical, medical device ... Histo-Scientific Research Laboratories (HSRL), Vet Path Services (VPS) and Tox Path Specialists ...
(Date:11/6/2019)... ... November 06, 2019 , ... ... new podcast to provide information to patients about a poorly disclosed deficiency in ... given without knowing the dose of the treating stem cells. This problem ...
(Date:11/5/2019)... ... November 05, 2019 , ... Dr. Lauren Kopp celebrates ... to Seattle, WA, including porcelain veneers , smile makeovers, dental implants, and ... of Washington, Dr. Kopp is passionate about serving her Seattle community with empathy ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/5/2019)... ... ... Ole, a German Shepherd, was demonstrating signs of osteoarthritis in April 2019. He was ... and his willingness to play were normal, it was clear that he was in pain. ... Animal Hospital and Referral Center in San Diego, California. Dr. Mullen is an ...
(Date:11/2/2019)... , ... October 31, 2019 , ... ... Adaptive Biotechnologies in a live webinar on Friday, November 15, ... immuno-oncology. , Immunosequencing, the science of profiling T-cell receptors (TCRs) and B-cell ...
(Date:10/30/2019)... ... October 30, 2019 , ... While using cold plasma to kill ... South Dakota School of Mines & Technology are exploring new ways to ... alive. , If successful, the technique would prove to be a drug-free, minimally ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... 2019 , ... CaroGen Corporation , a biotechnology company, today announced three ... Jack R Wands, MD, of Brown University , Dr. Steve Projan, PhD, ... MD, PhD, of Wayne State University, formerly a professor at Yale University School of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: