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World Wildlife Fund warns against iron dumping experiment near the Galapagos Islands

ooms induced by Planktos, Inc. and resulting bacteria after the phytoplankton die.

  • Bacterial decay following the induced phytoplankton bloom will consume oxygen, lowering oxygen levels in the water and changing its chemistry. This change in chemistry could favor the growth of microbes that produce powerful greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide.

  • The introduction of large amounts of iron to the ecosystem--unless it is in a very pure form, which is likely cost-prohibitive at the scales proposed--would probably be accompanied by other trace metals that would be toxic to some forms of marine life.

In the waters around the Galapagos, some 400 species of fish swim with turtles, penguins and marine iguanas above a vast array of urchins, sea cucumbers, crabs, anemones, sponges and corals. Many of these animals are found nowhere else on earth.

Reports indicate that Planktos, Inc. is planning other large-scale iron dumping in other locations in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.


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Contact: Kathleen Sullivan
kathleen.sullivan@wwfus.org
202-778-9576
World Wildlife Fund
27-Jun-2007


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