HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Yeast finding links processes in heart disease and cancer

By studying a little-known yeast too primitive to get diseases, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered a surprising link between two processes at play in heart disease and cancer in people.

In experiments with yeast known as S. pombe, the researchers discovered that a gene that helps the organism make cholesterol also helps it survive when oxygen is scarce. The finding, described in the March 25 issue of Cell, offers a new strategy for killing infectious yeast, but it also suggests that cells' efforts to make cholesterol and detect oxygen levels might be connected in people, too.

"We were simply trying to establish that this yeast could be a model for studying cholesterol-related activities in human cells," says the study's leader, Peter Espenshade, Ph.D., assistant professor of cell biology in Johns Hopkins' Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences. "We certainly didn't expect to find a completely new role for this gene."

It's already well established that human cells can both make cholesterol and sense oxygen. In people, high levels of cholesterol in the blood are a major risk factor for heart disease, and many human cancer cells are able to survive despite being in tumors' oxygen-starved centers.

"We don't know yet whether cholesterol production and oxygen sensing are connected in human cells, but now we're trying to find out," says Espenshade.

In people, the gene in question, known as SREBP, controls other genes whose products help make or import cholesterol. Cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins mimic this gene's natural role by triggering cells to import more cholesterol, clearing the artery-clogging stuff from the blood.

Despite the obvious medical relevance of SREBP, no one had ever looked at the equivalent system -- or even determined whether there was one -- in yeast, the simple, single-celled relatives with which we share many genes. Because yeast can be easily manipulated and studied, Espenshade figure
'"/>

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
24-Mar-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Yeast model shows promise as Alzheimers test
2. Yeast discovery gives insight into familial dysautonomia
3. Yeast network prevents damage by oxygen radicals
4. New findings challenge established views on human genome
5. New findings challenge established views about human genome
6. Depiction of findings selected as 2007 Image of the Year by Society for Nuclear Medicine
7. LIAI scientists make important finding on cytomegalovirus transmission
8. New findings in smell and taste
9. Study produces conflicting findings on the use of anti-anemia drug in cancer patients
10. Bloods clotting cells harbor ticking time bombs, finding may help extend blood supply
11. Stress and nerve cells survival in rats; finding may open window for depression treatment

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/27/2019)... ... November 26, 2019 , ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a ... Foundation and hosted by Dr. Steven Sampson and Dr. Danielle Aufiero of the ... 23, 2019, highlighted the ongoing efforts to promote research, educate the public, and provide ...
(Date:11/22/2019)... ... November 21, 2019 , ... The inventors of ... have announced a major step forward with that therapy, known as SurVaxM. MimiVax ... company, spun off from Roswell Park in 2012, has entered into a China-exclusive ...
(Date:11/19/2019)... ... ... Project Lifeline – a community partnership and research program initiated ... use disorder (SUD) – will take center stage at the upcoming NACDS ... in preventing and treating opioid abuse in Blair County, Pennsylvania, will receive the NACDS ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/30/2019)... ... October 30, 2019 , ... ... the many roles innovation and technology play in educating the next generation of ... hands-on learning opportunities and presentations by WesternU administrators and representatives of companies working ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... October 29, 2019 , ... Researchers ... Using Silios CMS-C multispectral imagers , researchers identified people by the image ... based on retinal imaging, face recognition, fingerprints and vasculature. , The new ...
(Date:10/22/2019)... ... October 22, 2019 , ... Catalent, a global leader in clinical supply services, ... Integration, will participate in a panel session titled “Cell and Gene Therapy Logistics” at ... Gwen Hotel, Chicago, on Oct. 28-30, 2019. , The panel session, on Wednesday, Oct. ...
(Date:10/17/2019)... PARK, Kan. (PRWEB) , ... October 15, 2019 ... ... to 23andMe, a leader among services that offer DNA Testing for health and/or ... so popular. Everywhere you look, it seems that people want to know more ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: