HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Zinc supplementation improved mental performance of 7th-grade boys and girls

eas to provide a measure of psychosocial function. Blood samples measured zinc status before and after the treatment.

Compared to the students who received no additional zinc, students who consumed an additional 20 mg zinc each day decreased reaction time on a visual memory task by 12 percent versus six percent; increased correct answers on a word recognition task by 9 percent versus three percent; and increased scores on a task requiring sustained attention and vigilance by 6 percent versus one percent. Those who received only 10 mg a day, the current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for this age group, did not significantly improve performance, however.

Supplementation at either the 10 mg or 20 mg did not appear to improve motor and social skills, although girls receiving the placebo experienced a 10 percent increase in conduct problems during the study while the behavior of girls receiving any level of zinc supplementation remained unchanged. If further studies confirm that the mental function, and in particular memory, of adolescents benefit from increasing zinc intakes, says Dr. Penland, then this and other similar studies would provide information that could be used when revising dietary guidelines for zinc in this age group.

Such guidelines ultimately affect school breakfast and lunch menus, the food guidance system, nutrition labels on food packages, and other uses. Zinc is a common essential mineral found in foods, particularly red meats, fish and grains. Previous studies have shown that zinc is needed for growth and immune function and may be important for eye-hand coordination and reasoning in very young children and in memory, muscle strength and endurance in adults.

Dr. Penland's co-investigators are Dr. Henry C. Lukaski, also from the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center (GFHNRC), and Dr. Jacqueline S. Gray, previously with GFHNRC and now with the Center for Rural Health at the University of North Dakota.
'"/>

Contact: Sarah Goodwin
ebpress@bellsouth.net
770-270-0989
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
4-Apr-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Zinc supplementation found to reduce mortality in older children
2. Antioxidant supplementation not associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer
3. Einstein researchers prototype vaccine could provide improved protection against tuberculosis
4. Gene expression pattern could lead to improved treatment of pediatric septic shock
5. Identification of genetic risk factor for coeliac disease promises improved treatment
6. Canadian paper innovation holds promise for improved global health safety
7. Enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound guidelines demonstrate improved efficacy and durability
8. Toward improved forms of a time-tested cholesterol-fighter
9. Report calls for improved monoclonal antibodies against solid tumors
10. UF scientists test improved gene therapy method for hereditary heart conditions
11. Novel method reveals how menthol discovery could point towards new or improved pain therapies

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/24/2014)... A decade-long effort by members of the International Glossina ... sequence of the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans . ... sickness, a potentially deadly disease endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. ... develop new ways to prevent the disease and provide ... tsetse fly is quite unique in the insect world: ...
(Date:4/24/2014)... University researchers are the first to sequence the genome ... eagle features that could lead to more effective conservation ... assumptions about golden eagle vision, indicating that the raptors ... previously thought. The genome also suggests that golden eagles ... realized. , Additionally, the genome provides thousands of ...
(Date:4/24/2014)... cells are more resilient in taking care of their ... components, cells can adapt and make copies of their ... published in this week,s Cell Reports , a ... cells can grow normally without a crucial component needed ... stored in DNA, which has to be continuously monitored ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled 2Genome yields insights into golden eagle vision, smell 2Cell resiliency surprises scientists 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... A study has been launched to test ... track could help to tackle the problem of obesity.  This ... GP surgery based in Stowmarket) and academics at University Campus ... Telemetry technology, which is inspired by equipment used to collect ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... NC (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 DTS ... to its Online Web Portal for Life Science organizations who ... to specify the subject matter of their documents in advance ... will help reduce time-to-delivery of translations, often a critical factor ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... Biotechnology Company, Limited ("TaiGen") today announced that they have ... pharmaceutical company, to develop and commercialize nemonoxacin (Taigexyn ® ... Turkey and other members of ... for the treatment of bacterial infections including those caused ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... provider of strategic communications services to corporations and organizations preparing for ... United States and Europe , today ... to the firm,s Washington, D.C. office. ... years of service as Associate Commissioner for the Office of External ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 2Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 3Formula 1 Technology Tackles Obesity in Unique Healthcare Partnership 4DTS Improves Efficiency for Life Science Document Translations 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 4Former FDA Associate Commissioner Returns To 3D Communications 2
Cached News: