HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
p53 gene mutations and inflammation trigger skin cancer

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a form of nonmelanoma skin cancer, which is the most common type of human malignancy with over 1 million new cases in the USA each year. In the July 2 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, two separate studies by research teams at Glasgow University and Baylor College of Medicine uncover 2 previously unidentified regulators of SCC development, providing insights into the development of this potentially lethal disease.

Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been implicated in tumor formation: some give rise to a loss-of-function whereas the majority of mutations result in a gain-of-function. In the first of these two studies, Dennis Roop, Carlos Caulin, and colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine, set out to determine whether gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations in p53 are more critical for SCC development. The authors show that certain p53 mutations occurring in human SCCs demonstrate gain-of-function properties that accelerate the frequency and progression of malignant SCC. Future studies will hopefully discover ways to target these mutations for therapeutic purposes.

A link between skin inflammation and SCC formation was first reported in the 19th century. In the second of these 2 new JCI studies, Robert Nibbs, Gerard Graham, and colleagues from Glasgow University show that the chemokine receptor D6 acts to sequester inflammatory molecules known as chemokines and as such is essential to suppressing the development of skin cancer. They show that D6-deficient mice are acutely sensitive to SCC formation and that D6 expression is induced in cells in close proximity to invasive SCC cells from human oral SCCs. In the absence of D6, skin inflammation sensitizes skin cells to tumor formation.

In an accompanying commentary on these two studies, David Owens from Columbia University in New York comments that if a heightened inflammatory state in the skin can influence p53 gain-o
'"/>

Contact: Brooke Grindlinger
press_releases@the-jci.org
734-546-5242
Journal of Clinical Investigation
2-Jul-2007


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Gene mutations linked to hereditary lung disease
2. UCLA scientists design masks to hide genetic mutations from cell
3. Tiny, spontaneous gene mutations may boost autism risk
4. New genetic mutations found that may cause cleft lip/palate
5. Computer tool helps pinpoint risky gene mutations
6. Novel EGFR ectodomain mutations in glioblastoma
7. More common associations found between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and cancer
8. Scientists find mutations that let bird flu adapt to humans
9. New study provides a clearer picture of breast-cancer gene mutations in American women
10. New findings offer more complete view of breast cancer gene mutations in US population
11. Gene mutations responsible for Rett syndrome in females present sporadically in males

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 30, 2019 , ... ... company, and Mayo Clinic, have documented significant differences in the prevalence of hereditary ... ethnic populations compared to non-Hispanic White women. Results will be presented at the ...
(Date:5/26/2019)... ... ... Zolgensma (Novartis, AveXis), an AAV-delivered gene therapy used to treat spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ... the Food and Drug Administration today. , The treatment is now both ... States and the second-ever approved treatment for SMA. , FDA granted priority review status ...
(Date:5/23/2019)... ... 23, 2019 , ... Inference Solutions , a global ... announced its inclusion in DMG Consulting’s 2019-2020 Intelligent Virtual Agent Product and Market ... share leader, based on number of customers, with 15.8% share of the global ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/14/2019)... ... May 14, 2019 , ... Gateway Genomics , a leading developer ... from 2,500 to 5,000 square feet. , “This past year has seen exponential ... Gateway Genomics CEO, Chris Jacob. “The SneakPeek At-Home test, which is mailed directly to ...
(Date:5/4/2019)... ... May 03, 2019 , ... ... of the Diopsys® ffERG/Photopic Negative Response vision test, a new full ... 2050, it is estimated that 6.3 million Americans will have glaucoma, with black ...
(Date:5/2/2019)... ... May 02, 2019 , ... ... will present results documenting discrepancies between U.S. insurer policies for genetic testing and ... risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). , Jill S. ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... April 18, 2019 , ... ... fossil fuels, a research team that includes a chemical engineer at Worcester Polytechnic ... exotic microorganism that may make it possible to manufacture isobutanol and other biofuels ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: