Blood sugar control partially a function of beliefs

Young adults who believe they can adhere to the regimen required to control their Type I diabetes have better blood sugar control than those who dont, according to a study appearing in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

The study also suggests that their can do beliefs achieve this effect by improving self-care practices, such as blood sugar testing and adherence to diet and exercise regimens.

Previous researchers have investigated the relationship between various psychosocial factors and diabetic control, or between self-care and diabetic control, among individuals with Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes, notes lead author Catharine H. Johnston-Brooks, Ph.D. of the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center. This study, however, is the first to demonstrate the relationship between the belief in ones capabilities of adhering to a diet and exercise regimen -- what psychologists and sociologists call self-efficacy -- and blood sugar control.

In addition, the present study lends credence to the commonly accepted hypothesis that the belief in ones ability to adhere to a diabetes regimen improves self-care, which in turn is associated with better blood sugar control.

Johnston-Brooks and her colleagues followed 88 young adults at a diabetes treatment center in Denver for one year. All were 18 to 35 years old and under treatment for diabetes for at least one year. Self-efficacy and quality of self-care were measured at the studys beginning with self-administered questionnaires. Blood sugar control was assessed by measuring blood levels of HbA1c, an indicator of blood sugar levels over the previous three months, at the studys beginning and at three-month intervals during the following year.

The results reveal that young adults with high self-efficacy tend to have the best blood sugar control and the best adherence to their self-care regimens, both in the short and long term. Moreover, Johnston-Brooks notes, they are consist

Contact: Randy Emeterio
Center for the Advancement of Health

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