HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Can we halt the deadly SARS?

AS CONCERN grows over the continuing spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, the key question is whether the disease can be contained. The answer will depend on how the virus spreads and evolves, which is still uncertain, and on whether healthcare systems, particularly in developing countries, can spot SARS and respond effectively.

So far, more than 1900 people in 22 countries have contracted SARS, of whom 63 have died. While China, Hong Kong and Singapore are hardest hit, some experts fear that poor public health monitoring in some countries may mean the number of cases is actually much higher.

The World Health Organization is bracing itself for outbreaks in countries currently claiming to be unaffected by SARS, including Cambodia, Indonesia and the Philippines. "We genuinely believe they have no cases at the moment. But we take the possibility of new outbreaks in this region very seriously," says Peter Cordingley, a spokesman for the WHO's Western Pacific headquarters in Manila.

The disease has so far been detected mainly in countries with good healthcare systems. But David Heymann, head of infectious diseases at the WHO in Geneva, says infected people may well have travelled to a country where an unexplained high fever and cough will not immediately draw attention. But the fact that SARS often infects healthcare workers could give it away, he says.

Even where healthcare facilities are good, it is extremely difficult to monitor an infection with such common symptoms and for which there is not yet a lab test. "With influenza, there is a well-defined test and a worldwide network set up to monitor it- and still there are nasty holes in that network," says Alan Hampson of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne, Australia.

India could already have undiagnosed cases, he says, as it only started checking airline passengers for SARS on 31 March. "Any country where the healthcare infrastructu
'"/>

Contact: Claire Bowles
claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk
44-207-331-2751
New Scientist
2-Apr-2003


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Clot-busting drugs may help detect potentially deadly leg clots
2. Broken heart syndrome: Real, potentially deadly but recovery quick
3. University of Manchester uses crystals to help battle deadly diseases
4. Stanford study reveals that cells linked to asthma and eczema also help cure deadly illness in mice
5. New technology blocks gene to increase immune response against deadly brain tumor cells
6. Protein helps immune system mount instant strike against deadly flu viruses
7. Duke physicians predict risks of deadly infections after cord blood transplants
8. Small and deadly
9. Northwestern Memorial enrolling participants in two trials on new drug to fight deadly cancer
10. Stents combined with clot-busting drugs effective in limiting impact of deadly form of stroke
11. In lab studies, blocking expression of gene reduces invasion of deadly brain tumor cells

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... Quality metrics are proliferating in cancer care, and are ... the eye of the beholder, according to experts who offered insights and commentary in ... Managed Care. For the full issue, click here . , For the American ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight loss fitness plan ... fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, , ... They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due ... up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away ... a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method ... —Johnson is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a ... such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain ... following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... According to a new market ... Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle Length (4mm, 5mm, 6mm, ... of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - Trends & Global Forecasts ... market for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. ... by 2021 from USD 1.65 Billion in 2016, growing ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  MedSource announced today that it has selected ... of choice.  This latest decision demonstrates MedSource,s commitment ... clients by offering a state-of-the-art electronic data capture ... as the EDC platform of choice in exchange ... has long been a preferred EDC platform by ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ITASCA, Ill. , June 23, 2016  In a startling ... states are failing their residents by lacking a comprehensive, proven plan ... , a definitive ranking of how states are tackling the ... rating to only four states – Kentucky , ... and Vermont . Of the 28 failing states, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: