HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Cardiac MRI detects thinned heart muscle previously deemed unsalvageable

ORLANDO, FLA. - Duke University Medical Center researchers have used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate that heart muscle that had been "thinned" by a heart attack could indeed be "saved" by restoring blood flow to the affected region.

In the past, physicians would typically write off such thinned heart tissue as unsalvageable and would not pursue revascularization therapy with coronary artery bypass surgery or angioplasty. However, the Duke researchers said that the cardiac MRI allows them to visualize the beating heart with a precision and specificity that conventional methods cannot match.

Although their study was based on a small sample of heart patients seen at Duke University and Northwestern University, Chicago, the researchers believe that as cardiac MRI is used more routinely in the imaging of the heart, it could become the new "gold standard" for determining heart muscle that while damaged, is still viable given appropriate treatment.

The results of the Duke study were presented today (Nov. 12, 2003) at the 76th annual scientific session of the American Heart Association, by cardiologist Dipan Shah, M.D., consulting assistant professor of medicine at Duke.

"Most cardiologists are beginning to recognize that MRI is becoming the gold standard for viability testing, because with its extremely high spatial resolution, it can detect details not seen before," Shah said. "The ability to differentiate between living and dead cells makes MRI a more direct measure of tissue viability than any other method."

During a cardiac MRI examination, which is non-invasive and radiation-free, a patient is guided through the cavity of a large doughnut-shaped magnet. The magnet causes hydrogen nuclei in cells to align, and when perturbed by radio waves, they give off characteristic signals, which are then converted by computers into three-dimensional images of the heart and its structures. While MRI technology itself i
'"/>

Contact: Richard Merritt
merri006@mc.duke.edu
919-684-4148
Duke University Medical Center
12-Nov-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Cardiac deaths peak in sleep hours for patients with sleep apnea
2. Cardiac imaging is underused in women to diagnose disease
3. The Larry King Cardiac Foundation presents The Changing Face of Heart Disease on Feb. 2
4. Cardiac complications from smallpox vaccination higher than expected among military personnel
5. Nuclear Cardiac Imaging: Society of Nuclear Medicine publishes new book
6. Cardiac MRI provides new 3-D images of beating heart
7. Cardiac disease significantly more debilitating for women than for men, new study finds
8. Cardiac differences in infants born to HIV-positive mothers may persist
9. American Heart Association Comment: Results Of Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study II (CIBIS-II)
10. Low Socio-Economic Status Heart Patients Need More Than Just Aggressive Cardiac Procedures
11. "Happy Hour" Is Unhappy For Many Cardiac Arrest Victims

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/28/2020)... ROCKVILLE, Md. (PRWEB) , ... March 27, 2020 ... ... a new way of life as COVID-19 cases grow by the day, people ... for children with language disorders—who have difficulties with social interactions in the best ...
(Date:3/28/2020)... ... , ... iPatientCare, a pioneer in cloud-based ambulatory EHR ... expanded the availability of telehealth services and other initiatives to help clients amid ... big role in fighting coronavirus . Increasing the telehealth services across the nation ...
(Date:3/27/2020)... ... March 27, 2020 , ... NeoTract, a wholly owned subsidiary ... urology, today announced that Harpreet Wadhwa, M.D., East Valley Urology Center in Mesa, ... that Dr. Wadhwa has achieved a high level of training and experience with ...
(Date:3/22/2020)... Fla. (PRWEB) , ... March 21, 2020 , ... ... patient communication, announces easy-to-implement solutions that hospitals, medical organizations, and health centers can ... sector adapts to the coronavirus pandemic, many medical professionals are working around the ...
(Date:3/20/2020)... ... , ... CommunityMed Urgent Care , based in Dallas, has rolled out ... patients present online, complete registration paperwork (including the latest COVID screening) provide IDs and ... signaled that their clean exam room is ready. All of this is done ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/1/2020)... ... 2020 , ... Dr. Michele S. Green, board-certified Anti-Aging Expert ... Beauty network. , The Haute Beauty Network, well known for its exclusivity, and ... , Haute Beauty offers a prominent collective of leading doctors nationwide. The invitation-only ...
(Date:3/30/2020)... EXTON, Pa. (PRWEB) , ... March 30, 2020 ... ... maintain connection with its employees, today announced it has launched a series of ... with employees and gather actionable feedback to inform mission-critical decisions. As the current ...
(Date:3/30/2020)... ... 30, 2020 , ... In order to provide continuous patient ... in addition to in-person visits. The San Diego-based leader in regenerative health therapies ... care professionals, and the community at large is the top priority. , ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: