Emory University researchers find clue to Huntington's disease mechanism

ATLANTA- Huntington's disease, an inherited progressive neurological disorder, often results in the degeneration of neurons in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that controls appetite and body weight. Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have discovered how rogue proteins generated by the genetic mistake present in Huntington's disease poison neurons in the hypothalamus. They demonstrate that the mutant proteins interfere with the function of another protein abundant in the hypothalamus huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP1).

The research is published in the July 30 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Lead authors are Shi-Hua Li, MD and Xiao-Jiang Li, PhD, faculty members in Emory's Department of Human Genetics, and Zhao-Xue Yu, PhD, postdoctoral fellow. Dr. Chuxia Deng's laboratory at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) also contributed to the study.

Huntington's disease eventually affects many parts of the brain, but the strongest impact is on the basal ganglia, responsible for coordination of movement. Onset usually occurs between 30 and 50 years of age, and the symptoms become progressively worse over the next 15 years. The main symptoms include loss of control of movement, depression and cognitive impairment. Complications include loss of body weight, heart failure and pneumonia. Huntington's occurs at a frequency of five to seven in a hundred thousand, and some relatives of affected individuals have a 50 percent risk of inheriting the responsible mutation responsible. No effective treatment exists.

Huntington's patients suffer from the genetic equivalent of a skipping record or CD In the gene responsible the huntingtin gene the enzymes that copy genetic information get stuck and make additional repeats of the same three-letter sequence CAG. When the number of repeats grows large enough, the property and function of the protein change. The now-expanded region of the pro

Contact: Holly Korschun
Emory University Health Sciences Center

Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Emory Study finds HIV is not an independent risk factor for severe heart disease
2. Emory cardiologists present research at AHA scientific sessions in New Orleans, Nov. 7 - 10
3. Emory study finds mental health and heart disease tightly linked
4. Emory conference to educate health professionals about metabolic syndrome
5. Emory researcher examines effects of antiepileptic drugs on pregnant women and their offspring
6. Emory researchers find race and gender gaps in treatment of heart attack
7. Emory, GlaxoSmithKline, NIMH enter public-private partnership to develop new drugs for depression
8. Emory and CDC scientists explore why most breastfed infants of HIV-positive mothers resist infection
9. Emory scientists find marker for long-term immunity
10. Emory scientists find oral tetrahydrobiopterin can reduce high blood pressure
11. Emory scientists link atrial fibrillation with decrease in nitrous oxide

Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/29/2015)... , ... November 29, 2015 , ... While conventional walkers ... or provide ready access to exercise weights. Fortunately, an inventor from Uniontown, Pa., has ... TOMMY WALKER to enhance the benefits of a standard walker to improve the user’s ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... ... November 29, 2015 , ... Effective immediately, every single IguanaMed scrub style ... Black Friday Target is offering a “Buy One Scrub Set, Get the 2nd Scrub ... to purchase IguanaMed at a discounted price. , IguanaMed’s mission is to ...
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... 28, 2015 , ... Safe storage for contraceptive devices may not always be ... New Jersey and the other from Bradley Beach, New Jersey, there is an easy ... of having to replace NuvaRings more often than necessary. As such, it affords peace ...
(Date:11/28/2015)... CA (PRWEB) , ... November 28, 2015 , ... Pixel ... fully customizable media panels to choose from, the possibilities are endless. Users have full ... more. With the ProPanel: Pulse masking effects, users are sure to get heads to ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... According to an article published November 6th by The ... of British Columbia suggested that laws requiring bicyclists to wear helmets may not actually ... the reason for the controversial conclusion is that, while helmets have certainly prevented a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/27/2015)... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/8v9x5q/2016_global_tumor ) ... "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier ... Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, Instrumentation Review, Competitive ... offering. --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/8v9x5q/2016_global_tumor ) has ... Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier Shares ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26 november 2015 AAIPharma Services ... geplande investering aan van ten minste $15,8 ... en het mondiale hoofdkantoor in ... resulteren in extra kantoorruimte en extra capaciteit ... groeiende behoeften van de farmaceutische en biotechnologische ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 --> ... SyMRI to find optimal contrast weighting of MRI for ... has signed a research agreement with SyntheticMR in order to ... SyMRI, it is possible to generate multiple contrast images from ... patient has left, thus making it possible to both fine ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: