HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Environmental enrichment lessens protein deficits in mouse model of Huntington's

WASHINGTON, DC March 4 Staying physically or mentally active can slow down chemical changes in the brain that lead to the neurodegeneration of Huntington's disease, researchers show in a mouse model of the disorder.

Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stop declining when Huntington's disease transgenic mice are housed in an enriched environment, the scientists say. BDNF promotes neuron growth and survival and can also regulate communication between neurons.

"The finding that environmental enrichment increases BDNF, and that this slows disease progression, provides a potential mechanism for the effects of environmental enrichment on Huntington's disease," says M. Flint Beal, chair of neurology at Cornell University Medical College in New York.

The new study appears in the March 3 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience and was supported by the U.K. Medical Research Council.

Huntington's disease is a genetic brain disorder that usually strikes in midlife. As the disease progresses, patients experience involuntary dancelike movements called chorea, as well as cognitive decline. Currently, there are no effective treatments, and patients with the disease usually die 10 to 20 years after onset. The disorder affects approximately 30,000 Americans.

In the study, enriched mice had play objects placed in their cages that changed every two days, such as small, open, wooden boxes and cylindrical cardboard tunnels. To measure motor symptoms, the researchers placed five-month-old enriched and nonenriched mice on the central cylinder of a rotarod apparatus. The cylinder rotated, slowly at first, then accelerating. The amount of time a mouse remained on the rotating rod was a measure of Huntington's disease-associated motor symptoms.

In transgenic mice housed without enrichment, BDNF protein levels declined, but in mice housed in enriched conditions, the levels remained normal. Enriched mice also showed fewer Huntington
'"/>

Contact: Dawn McCoy
dawn@sfn.org
202-462-6688
Society for Neuroscience
8-Mar-2004


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Environmental tobacco smoke linked to reading, math, logic and reasoning declines in children
2. Environmental educators win 2004 Tyler Prize
3. Environmental inequities cluster to harm poor children
4. Environmental and dietary influences on cancer risk
5. Environmental influences found to have role for development and function of the pain system
6. Cooling lessens brain damage in sick newborn babies
7. Alcohol researchers identify new medication that lessens relapse risk
8. Targeting mutant B-Raf protein reduces melanoma development
9. Mechanism of RNA recoding: New twists in brain protein production
10. Epstein-Barr virus protein crucial to its role in blood cancers
11. Neuronal death and processing of Tau protein in Alzheimers disease

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... that as many as 10 million older Americans suffer ... and isolation. , However, new research a project ... Americans for six years found that Internet use ... by more than 30 percent. , "That,s a very ... professor of telecommunication, information studies and media who led ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... April 17, 2014-- Colic affects about one in five ... numerous pediatric visits during the first several months after ... symptoms was showing promise; however, the April 1, 2014 ... Sung, Valerie) reported on a study, "Probiotics and Infant ... L reuteri for infant colic did not ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered ... in an experimental model. The findings, reported in ... Abuse , may lead to more effective treatments ... one of the leading causes of illness and ... economic impact by limiting the productivity of workers ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that ... role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity ... the complex has been shown to perform both jobs. ... target to control cellular energy production, potentially advancing cancer ... today in the journal Developmental Cell . , ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of ... a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in ... 17 issue of The New England Journal of ... a class of highly-resistant bacteria known as methicillin-resistant ... cause of hospital and community-associated infections. The superbug has ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Internet use can help ward off depression among elderly 2Health News:New study says probiotic use for infant colic is not effective in reducing symptoms 2Health News:BUSM researchers find anti-seizure drug may reduce alcohol consumption 2Health News:Dual role: Key cell division proteins also power up mitochondria 2Health News:New MRSA superbug emerges in Brazil 2
(Date:1/14/2014)... Healthcare Services, Inc. ("DHS"), a portfolio company of GMH Ventures ... Equipment, Inc. ("Progressive") of Clarion, PA ... not disclosed. Progressive is a full service ... sleep, mobility, and respiratory products to customers in the western ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... , Jan. 14, 2014   NuAire , a manufacturer of ... agreement with Hitachi Koki of Japan ... North America . NuAire will utilize its network ... and Canada to offer assistance in application ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... New York , January 14, 2014 ... Closed System Transfer Devices (CSTD) for hazardous drugs, today announced ... for the fourth straight year.   ... for pharmacy technicians, pharmacists, nurses and other medical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:Dynamic Healthcare Services Completes Progressive Home Medical Equipment of Clarion, PA Investment 2Dynamic Healthcare Services Completes Progressive Home Medical Equipment of Clarion, PA Investment 3NuAire announces sales and service of Hitachi Koki centrifuges in North America 2Equashield's Sales Grow by 60% in 2013 2
Cached News: