HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
'Exercise Hypertension' occurs when cells can't 'relax,' Hopkins researchers find

So-called "exercise hypertension," an abnormally high spike in blood pressure experienced by generally healthy people during a workout, is a known risk factor for permanent and serious high blood pressure at rest. But who gets it, and why, has been largely unknown.

Now, Johns Hopkins scientists say they have reason to believe that the problem is rooted in the failure of cells that line the blood vessels to allow the arteries to expand to accommodate increased blood flow during exertion.

"Our study shows that this impaired ability of the endothelial cells, which control large blood vessel relaxation, is a potential cause of exercise hypertension," says Kerry J. Stewart, Ed.D., lead study author and director of clinical exercise physiology at Hopkins. "Because as many as 90 percent of adults are at risk for developing high blood pressure, knowing this may point to a cellular target for preventive therapies."

Normally during exercise, blood pressure increases to push the flow of oxygen-rich blood throughout the body. However, in some individuals, the response to exercise is exaggerated. Instead of reaching a systolic (upper number) blood pressure of around 200 mmHg at maximal exercise, they spike at 250 mmHg or higher.

For the study, published in the April issue of the American Journal of Hypertension, the investigators evaluated 38 men and 44 women ages 55 to 75 who had untreated mild hypertension but were otherwise healthy. Their blood pressures at rest ranged from 130 to 159 mmHg systolic (the upper number) and 85 to 99 mmHg diastolic (the lower number).

To measure endothelial function, the researchers first used ultrasound to measure the size of a large artery in the arm. Next they put a tight blood pressure cuff on one of the subjects' arms for five minutes to stop blood flow to the arm, then deflated the cuff, causing a surge of blood flow. They then repeated the artery size measurement, comparing it to the resti
'"/>

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
6-Apr-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. PITT, OHSU: When early life stress occurs determines its impact later
2. Most acquisition of meningitis bacteria among students occurs in first week of university term
3. Suppressing the cells that trigger cat allergy
4. Indiana University researchers closer to helping hearing-impaired using stem cells
5. Some brain cells change channels to fine-tune the message
6. Hopkins begins human trials with donor adult stem cells to repair muscle damaged from heart attack
7. Tumor-targeted immune cells cure prostate cancer in mice without causing systemic immune suppression
8. Study suggests smoking while pregnant may increase chromosomal abnormalities in fetal cells
9. Computational tool predicts how drugs work in cells, advancing efforts to design better medicines
10. Smart immune cells kill more cancer
11. CK2 protein sustains colon cancer cells by sabotaging ability to commit suicide

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/1/2020)... ... September 01, 2020 , ... KitoTech Medical, ... convertible note financing, which will be used to accelerate the commercialization of its ... financing, the company will continue to expand its customer base of healthcare systems ...
(Date:9/1/2020)... ... September 01, 2020 , ... As fall and winter ... Cohn Health Institute has taken this time to expand and grow into ... 30th Anniversary, the Cohn Health Institute will be relaunching its brand new website, expanding ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... , ... August 31, 2020 , ... ... Network (AHN), are joining biomedical engineers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to develop ... cardiac patients who have undergone open heart surgery. , The AGH/CMU team was ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... August 31, 2020 , ... Just found out your dear friend has ... heartbreaking when your friend or family member shares their diagnosis. Once the shock wears off, ... say the wrong thing? What are the best ways to help? Words are failing me. ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... August 31, 2020 , ... Want to get moving, break up your ... Foundation (CPARF) is thrilled to launch its fourth annual STEPtember campaign in the United ... STEPtember meets everyone wherever they are at this moment — encouraging people to move ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/28/2020)... ... ... Dr. Mark Surrey has been in practice for over 25 years. ... in the Department of OBGYN at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. , ... and is a Clinical Director of Fellowship Training for UCLA & Cedars Sinai Reproductive ...
(Date:8/27/2020)... , ... August 27, 2020 , ... ... software, today announced the successful completion of their 2020 System and Organizational Controls ... their HITRUST® interim assessment and MARS-E compliance assessment. These achievements reflect their long-standing ...
(Date:8/27/2020)... ... ... is right round the corner and the risk of getting caught by influenza is getting ... to harbor its effects on us. Already with the sudden outbreak of COVID 19, the ... Hence it has become even more relevant to keep oneself immune from any of disease. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: