HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Heart-stopping drugs

A NEW way of stopping the heart during bypass operations could reduce damage to the heart and improve patients' chances of a full recovery.

More than a million people a year have open-heart surgery to unblockor bypass clogged arteries, or repair damaged valves. The heart is usually stopped for about one hour while they are under the knife because it is impossible to operate on a moving target. But the standard method of achieving this- flooding the heart with potassium ions- can cause permanent damage.

Now Geoffrey Dobson and Michael Jones of James Cook University in Townsville, Australia, have developed an alternative. It has only been tested on animals so far, but experts say the results, due to appear in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, look promising. "By keeping potassium levels normal they are preventing injuries to the muscle cells and to the vessels that carry blood to the heart," says Peter Macdonald, a cardiologist at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney.

In resting muscle cells, the distribution of ions across the cell membrane generates an electric potential. The waves of electrical activity that sweep across the heart, telling muscle cells to contract, are generated when channels in the membrane open, allowing ions to flow across the membrane and depolarise the cells. Flooding the heart with potassium ions freezes its cells in this depolarised state.

Dobson and Jones instead freeze the heart in the resting state using two drugs: adenosine, which opens some of the channels that transport potassium ions in and out of the cell, and lignocaine (known as lidocainein the US), which blocks sodium ion channels.

"There are two ways to stop a heart cell. Let it run out of gas- that's the potassium infusion-or to not even turn it on. That's what Dobson has done," says Jakob Vinten-Johansen, a cardiovascular physiologist at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, who now collaborates with Dobson.

Whe
'"/>

Contact: Claire Bowles
claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk
44-207-331-2751
New Scientist
17-Sep-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. UW research shows risk factors for relapse among health care professionals who abuse drugs
2. New studies show mixed results on epilepsy drugs and birth defects
3. Newly discovered pathway might help in design of cancer drugs
4. Study examines consequences of Thailands war on drugs
5. Computational tool predicts how drugs work in cells, advancing efforts to design better medicines
6. Three anti-platelet drugs used in combination are safe
7. HIV patients may be at risk of heart problems when taking protease inhibitor drugs
8. Clot-busting drugs may help detect potentially deadly leg clots
9. Herb used to treat diabetes works like modern-day prescription drugs, study suggests
10. Penn study shows how next-generation diabetic drugs could work more selectively
11. Study shows drugs such as Vioxx and Celebrex were widely over-used long before recent problems

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop ... The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, ... all type program , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn hand ... project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand Cartoon’s ... within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and drag ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a ... the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who ... , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants to support ... as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the ... Genome magazine’s Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families ... to be presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  MedSource announced today ... its e-clinical software solution of choice.  This latest ... possible value to their clients by offering a ... preferred relationship establishes nowEDC as the EDC platform ... MedSource,s full-service clients.  "nowEDC has long been a ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Research and ... Excipients Market by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), ... Topical, Coating, Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is projected ... CAGR of 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has announced ... Analysis 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report to their ... contains up to date financial data derived from varied research ... trends with potential impact on the market during the next ... which comprises of sub markets, regional and country level analysis. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: