HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Heart-stopping drugs

A NEW way of stopping the heart during bypass operations could reduce damage to the heart and improve patients' chances of a full recovery.

More than a million people a year have open-heart surgery to unblockor bypass clogged arteries, or repair damaged valves. The heart is usually stopped for about one hour while they are under the knife because it is impossible to operate on a moving target. But the standard method of achieving this- flooding the heart with potassium ions- can cause permanent damage.

Now Geoffrey Dobson and Michael Jones of James Cook University in Townsville, Australia, have developed an alternative. It has only been tested on animals so far, but experts say the results, due to appear in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, look promising. "By keeping potassium levels normal they are preventing injuries to the muscle cells and to the vessels that carry blood to the heart," says Peter Macdonald, a cardiologist at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney.

In resting muscle cells, the distribution of ions across the cell membrane generates an electric potential. The waves of electrical activity that sweep across the heart, telling muscle cells to contract, are generated when channels in the membrane open, allowing ions to flow across the membrane and depolarise the cells. Flooding the heart with potassium ions freezes its cells in this depolarised state.

Dobson and Jones instead freeze the heart in the resting state using two drugs: adenosine, which opens some of the channels that transport potassium ions in and out of the cell, and lignocaine (known as lidocainein the US), which blocks sodium ion channels.

"There are two ways to stop a heart cell. Let it run out of gas- that's the potassium infusion-or to not even turn it on. That's what Dobson has done," says Jakob Vinten-Johansen, a cardiovascular physiologist at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, who now collaborates with Dobson.

Whe
'"/>

Contact: Claire Bowles
claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk
44-207-331-2751
New Scientist
17-Sep-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. UW research shows risk factors for relapse among health care professionals who abuse drugs
2. New studies show mixed results on epilepsy drugs and birth defects
3. Newly discovered pathway might help in design of cancer drugs
4. Study examines consequences of Thailands war on drugs
5. Computational tool predicts how drugs work in cells, advancing efforts to design better medicines
6. Three anti-platelet drugs used in combination are safe
7. HIV patients may be at risk of heart problems when taking protease inhibitor drugs
8. Clot-busting drugs may help detect potentially deadly leg clots
9. Herb used to treat diabetes works like modern-day prescription drugs, study suggests
10. Penn study shows how next-generation diabetic drugs could work more selectively
11. Study shows drugs such as Vioxx and Celebrex were widely over-used long before recent problems

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... LaserShip, a regional parcel ... the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan last Friday in order to aid in the ... the Midwest to include a facility located in Clio, only 15 miles away from ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... InDemand Interpreting ... Healthcare, recently partnered with Heart City Health Center to improve access ... years, Heart City Health Center has provided the Elkhart community with access to ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , ... February 10, 2016 , ... 10 Best ... There were three leading bottled water brand owners that topped the list as a ... connectivity and optimize conversion. The premier brand was Tibet 5100, a top notch water ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... United Benefit Advisors ... the latest addition to its growing list of Partner Firms. S.S. Nesbitt ... from Orlando to Huntsville and in between. , Harnessing the experience and insights ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Pediatric therapists are challenged to ... shows that the Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) captures 20% more change in outcomes ... more about the Goal Attainment Scale, Education Resources Inc. is offering a course ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... MINNEAPOLIS , Feb. 10, 2016 Urologix, ... for the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), announces ... Ash Keswani , a medical device industry veteran ... of the Limited Liability Company.  ... and service lines, Cooled ThermoTherapy™ and Prostiva® RF Therapy, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Pharma Inc. (TSE: 4503, President and CEO: Yoshihiko ... completed, through its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary Laurel Acquisition Inc. ... outstanding shares of common stock of Ocata Therapeutics, Inc. ... "Ocata") for a price of US$8.50 per share net ... the Tender Offer on November 19, 2015, U.S. Eastern ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , Feb. 10, 2016  The ALS Association, in partnership ... Grand Challenge to generate a biomarker to track TDP43 aggregation. ... up to a $1 million investment. ... disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the ... initiate and control muscle movement, which often leads to total ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: