HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Jefferson and Molecular Targeting Technologies, Inc. scientists create vaccine for wildlife rabies

While the raccoon that raids your trash at night may look cute and mischievous, think again. Its claws can be nasty. Even worse, it might carry rabies.

Now, scientists at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and at Molecular Targeting Technologies, Inc. (MTTI) in West Chester, Pa., are taking steps to prevent the disease. They have created a more powerful, safer vaccine than currently is available to combat rabies in wildlife.

Wildlife rabies is no small matter in this country. It's particularly prevalent along the East Coast, and more than 90 percent of reported cases of rabies in all are in wildlife. Raccoons are the most affected, with skunk a close second. Worldwide, and especially in underdeveloped nations, rabies takes a large human toll: More than 60,000 human deaths a year.

In work published December 9 in the journal Vaccine, researchers led by Bernhard Dietzschold, DVM, professor of microbiology and immunology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, created a new live rabies vaccine by manipulating the virus itself, making it much weaker than before. The scientists also made the vaccine much more immunogenic, meaning it aroused a much more robust response from the immune system.

"The advantages of our vaccine are its lack of pathogenicity and the fact that it's much more immunogenic," he says. Live virus vaccines always carry the potential to actually cause the disease they are designed to prevent.

"We have developed a very specific rabies vaccine which displays high titers and the lack of pathogenicity for immunocompetent mice even after many passages," says Dr. Dietzschold, meaning that the vaccine retained its potency over time. "This novel rabies vaccine will be an excellent candidate for immunization of stray dogs and wildlife."

"We have found a master key to turn on and off the pathogenicity of the virus," says Chris Pak, Ph.D., MTTI president and CEO. "We are extremely pleased with these p
'"/>


8-Dec-2004


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Jefferson Lab medical imager spots breast cancer
2. Jefferson scientists uncover potential trigger of diabetic kidney disease
3. Uric acid may help reduce effects of spinal cord injury, Jefferson researchers find
4. Jefferson scientists help explain statins effects in Alzheimers disease
5. Jefferson scientists find zinc may help prevent esophageal, oral cancers
6. Jefferson virologists coax HIV out of hiding
7. Jefferson scientists find way to see breast cancer activity from outside the body
8. Jefferson scientists use gene therapy to rescue failing hearts in animals
9. Jefferson scientists reveal how some types of rabies invade the brain
10. Jefferson neuroscientists studying new type of Alzheimers drug to halt disease progression
11. Jefferson scientists uncover new evidence to help explain statins effects in Alzheimers disease

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/30/2016)... ... ... Orlando-based Maximized Living has selected Dr. Nick Wilson of Indianapolis to support ... care of Maximized Living doctors at the London Olympics in 2012, U.S. wrestlers won ... the largest contingent of elite chiropractors to Rio to support and care for members ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Hollywood, Fl (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 ... ... was recently notified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) that ... , This is the first accreditation of three residency programs that Memorial ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Dr. Bernie Siegel, ... "LOVE, MEDICINE and MIRACLES") addresses touchy topics related to Death live on ... Dr. Bernie Siegel, author of a plethora of essential books-to-read for physicians ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Spine Team Texas, a comprehensive spine physician group ... of their physicians has been invited to be a featured speaker at the Texas ... conference on April 30, 2016. , Dr. R. Scott McPherson, a physical medicine ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... the deadliest type of skin cancer. Although only about 1 percent of skin cancer cases ... 10,000 people are expected to die of melanoma this year. The risk increases with age, ... most commonly diagnosed cancers in young women. A recent breakthrough in genetic studies may give ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... April 27, 2016 Oasmia ... developer of a new generation of drugs within ... survival results for Paclical/Apealea in the Phase III ... with epithelial ovarian cancer. These preliminary results showed ... combination with carboplatin versus Taxol in combination with ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... Switzerland , April 27, 2016 ... AG announced the launch of a Phase 2 clinical ... residual hearing in patients undergoing cochlear implantation (CI) surgery. ... recruiting patients in Germany and ... into the middle ear at the time of surgery. ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... 26, 2016 US demand for infection ... 4.9 percent annually to $27.6 billion in 2020.  ... to decrease rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) will ... and services.  Although declining, the overall rate of ... levels set by the CDC.  Recent statistics indicate ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: