HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
National Study Suggests Heart Attack Severity May Be Declining

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- The severity of heart attacks in the United States is apparently declining, a Wake Forest University School of Medicine researcher told the American Heart Association today. Possible reasons for the decline include increased preventive measures and better treatment for heart attacks.

David C. Goff Jr., M.D., Ph.D., said results from previous analyses of the long-running Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study show that both in-hospital and out-of-hospital coronary heart disease mortality decreased between 1987 and 1994, paralleling national and international statistics.

Goff, associate professor of public health sciences (epidemiology) focused his analysis on whether severity of heart attacks was declining.

He told the Heart Association's Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention in Orlando that analysis of a number of heart attack indicators supports the contention that the average size of the infarct -- the area of heart muscle damaged by the heart attack -- decreased over the study period. The smaller the affected area, the smaller the resulting disability.

"These changes may be due to preventive efforts or to improvements in acute treatments," he said. "Primary prevention efforts, like blood pressure and cholesterol control, may have led to lower severity of heart attacks when heart attacks occur."

The widely reported ARIC cohort study involves about 16,000 randomly selected participants in Forsyth County, N.C., Jackson, Miss., Hagerstown, Md. and suburban Minneapolis, Minn. But a second community surveillance component of ARIC involves complete recording of all heart attacks and coronary heart disease mortality in each ARIC community.

Goff studied records of patients between ages 35 and 74 in the ARIC communities who had definite or probable heart attacks between Jan. 1, 1987, and Dec. 31, 1994. Of the 8,807 cases, he focused on 4
'"/>

Contact: Robert Conn, Mark Wright or Jim Steele
rconn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4587
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
24-Mar-1999


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. National Academies advisory: May 2 Symposium on International Science Policy
2. National Academies News: William H. Foege to receive Public Welfare Medal, Academys highest honor
3. National Academies news: Academy honors 17 for major contributions to science
4. National Academies advisory: Report assesses health implications of perchlorate exposure
5. National Academies Advisory: Jan. 11 public briefing on perchlorate in drinking water
6. National Academies news: Gulf War and Health
7. National survey shows few physicians elected to Congress
8. Six new Roybal Centers for Applied Gerontology established by National Institute on Aging
9. UGA professor receives $3 million grant from National Cancer Institute for breast cancer research
10. National Academies advisory: Nov. 4-6 Frontiers of Science meeting in Irvine, Calif.
11. National Chemistry Week celebrates health and wellness in Washington, D.C., area

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... Viewers who ... variety of critical historical facts, cultural practices, goods, services, and societal issues tend to ... will look into the popular practice of utilizing running events for causes around the ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... ... Time GPS”: a dauntless and enlightened study of the second-coming of Christ, and ... published author, Wesley Gerboth, a World War II veteran, with a highly-regarded reputation as ... ninety-one, he shares the Wisdom God bestowed upon him in this publication. , ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , ... March 23, 2017 , ... A recent report ... entry into teacher preparation programs. The NCTQ report suggests, based on a review of ... would significantly improve teacher quality in the U.S. It argues that this higher bar ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... ... The IoT (Internet of Things) is revolutionizing the way the world operates. ... individual consumers alike. Laboratories can maximize their profit margin by increasing throughput. ... to $11 trillion dollars by the year 2025. McKinsey expects the IoT to have ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Benefits delivery ... innovative mobile app and centralized benefits dashboard solving one of the top frustrations ... multiple locations. For the first time, employees can access up-to-date information and account ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... LITTLE SILVER, N.J. , March 23, 2017 ... device company, today announced that it has kicked ... in-growth into their 3D printed bone segments. ... of Engineering, "Our unique variable honeycomb lattice structures ... bone in-growth as compared to current allograft wedges ...
(Date:3/23/2017)...  Drug diversion is a significant contributing factor ... A new oral fluid monitoring test, announced today ... more detailed and actionable information to clinicians than ... adherence, patient safety, and help to identify drug ... Rx Evaluation (CORE) system is the first patient-monitoring ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017 Ascendis Pharma A/S (Nasdaq: ASND), a ... address significant unmet medical needs in rare diseases, today ... and webcast on Monday, April 3 during ENDO 2017, ... Orlando, Florida , to discuss new data ... Hormone, TransCon PTH and TransCon CNP). Ascendis ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: