HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
One dose of 'designer' gene therapy may target specific body area

DALLAS, Jan. 20 Doctors may soon be able to inject gene therapy intravenously that travels to a specific part of the body, according to a study published in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

"It may be possible to design and construct genetically engineered 'designer' gene therapy for selectively delivering genes to any part of the body," said Andrew H. Baker, Ph.D., lead investigator of the study and a reader in molecular medicine at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. "We can't do that now because much of what's injected would be sequestered by the liver." The liver cleanses the blood of foreign material, among other functions.

Gene therapy involves inserting the treatment genes into a virus that is either harmless to humans or has had its disease-causing component removed. The virus is then injected or inserted into the body where it "infects" an area with gene therapy.

Baker's team redesigned a virus called adeno-associated virus (AAV) so that it is not quarantined by the liver, but rather remained in the bloodstream long enough to "infect" specific cells in the body -- in this case, the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The new therapy targets vascular endothelial cells, which line the inside of blood vessels.

"Vascular endothelial cells, which are in continuous contact with the bloodstream and integrally involved in cardiovascular abnormalities, are appropriate targets for gene therapy," Baker said.

Baker said that AAV is important because it has the potential for long-term gene expression from a single dose. This is based on results from hemophilia studies from other laboratories in which the virus was used to deliver gene therapy. In these studies, Baker said that a single dose could last up to five years, possibly longer as the studies are ongoing. AAV is also a good choice because it does not cause disease in humans.

"The concept of developing systematica
'"/>

Contact: Carole Bullock
carole.bullock@heart.org
214-706-1279
American Heart Association
19-Jan-2004


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Study shows patch therapy may be as effective as oral medications
2. Novel therapy tested in mice could chase away cat allergies
3. Drug therapy may be comparable to invasive cardiac procedures for elderly patients with heart attack
4. Risk of cardiac death after radiotherapy for breast cancer has declined, study finds
5. Antiretroviral therapy may prevent excess risk of some cancers in people with HIV
6. Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy prolongs survival for some patients with advanced lung cancer
7. Breakthrough in medical research: New chemotherapy gives hope to brain tumour patients
8. Two years after gene therapy treatments, severe angina patients showed prolonged clinical benefit
9. Combining PET and CT scans leads to more accurate radiation therapy for lung cancer patients
10. Cognitive behavioral therapy and medication is effective in the treatment of panic disorder
11. Study finds drug eluting stents as effective as vascular brachytherapy in preventing restenosis

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/26/2016)... ... , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a ... fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, ... type program , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice ... overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, ... a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Dr. Calvin Johnson has ... he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for treating his patients. The ... first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances that orthopaedic surgeons use ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a complex set ... drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain and suffering, ... traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, from depression, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced that ... chosen by their peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 percent ... special honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: Miami ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... and INDIANAPOLIS , June ... receiving a Lilly Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is any ... scholarship winners, announced today online at www.diabetesscholars.org ... type 1 diabetes stand in the way of academic ... supported the Foundation,s scholarship program since 2012, and continues ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Revolutionary ... Oticon , industry leaders in advanced audiology ... of Oticon Opn ™, the world,s first internet ... possibilities for IoT devices.      (Photo: ... introduces a number of ,world firsts,: , ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 The vast majority ... outpatient dialysis facility.  Treatments are usually 3 times a ... per visit, including travel time, equipment preparation and wait ... but especially grueling for patients who are elderly and ... skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers for some duration of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: