HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
PENN study emphasizes need for national guidelines for assisted reproductive technology programs

(Philadelphia, PA) - Infertility prevents roughly 6.1 million people in the United States from having children. As a result, infertile individuals and couples commonly seek to become parents through assisted reproductive technology (ART). Since 1981, approximately 177,000 babies have been born via ART: and, in one year alone (2000), some 100,000 cycles of ART were attempted, resulting in 60,253 live births. Beyond the factors of infertility and a candidate's ability to afford treatment, little is known about the qualifications that ART programs use to determine a candidate's eligibility for parenthood. This raises the question: Should there be guidelines to determine who should be eligible to use this technology for reproduction?

A new study sponsored by the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine sheds important light on the values that govern access to ART. The study, published in the January 2005 issue of the journal Fertility and Sterility, reveals an alarming inconsistency in the candidate-screening practices of different ART programs in the United States. Indeed, "the majority of programs in the U.S. do not have a formal policy for screening, leaving individual clinics and programs to set their own boundaries" says Andrea Gurmankin, PhD, principal investigator for the study, which was completed while Gurmankin was still a member of Penn's faculty: she has since joined the Harvard School of Public Health, where she now serves as Assistant Professor in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health. By contrast, many countries, such as the United Kingdom, have national or professional guidelines for screening program candidates.

According to the researchers, the important role played by clinics in controlling access to ART in the U.S. emphasizes the need to more openly discuss and, in turn, establish ART candidate-screening qualifications to ensure equality across different programs. The study also reve
'"/>

Contact: Tiffany Savickas
tiffany.savickas@uphs.upenn.edu
215-615-3353
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
18-Jan-2005


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. First head-to-head study to compare lidoderm patch and Celebrex in treating pain
2. UMaine study looks at infants and chronic nighttime crying
3. Chronic pain treatments more effective when taken together, new study shows
4. UNC study: Most N.C. family practitioners engage in unrecognized community service
5. New study in Nature demonstrates protection against cell death during heart attack
6. UCSF study offers insight into human circadian rhythms
7. International breast cancer prevention study launches in the United States and Canada
8. UW study shows blacks and Latinos are more satisfied with physicians of the same race
9. Physicians may not be accurate in their confidence levels of their diagnoses, says Pitt study
10. Advertising by academic medical centers may risk eroding public trust, says study
11. Fat may promote inflammation, new study suggests

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/12/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Remote Medical Technologies (RMT) will be a ... Annual Meeting being held in National Harbor, Maryland on March 18th to the ... RMT’s Mobile-Cart Solution . These solutions are high-performance HD telepathology systems ...
(Date:3/12/2019)... ... 12, 2019 , ... Caring Transitions is pleased to recognize Caring Transitions North ... owned by mother/daughter team Donna and Nicole Rea with the support of their team. ... Donna and Nicole of Caring Transitions of North Dallas Suburbs drove them to be ...
(Date:3/12/2019)... ... March 12, 2019 , ... When it comes to selecting ... to treat pain and diseases of joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments, “choose wisely,” ... the movie Indiana Jones. , “Some clinics and health centers have been built ...
(Date:3/12/2019)... , ... March 12, 2019 , ... A recent report ... facilities. Focusing on a series of Idaho case studies, the report argues that charter ... These arguments, while focused on Idaho in this particular report, have been made with ...
(Date:3/12/2019)... ... March 12, 2019 , ... The U.S. healthcare industry has ... each patient moving through different care settings. With a shared goal of providing ... ® today announced its support for broader discussions about the unique patient identifier ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/17/2019)... ... March 17, 2019 , ... The arthroscopic ... restored shoulder function and the opportunity to return to sports and physically-demanding work, ... Las Vegas, Nevada. The study, which examined patient outcomes up to five years ...
(Date:3/16/2019)... , ... March 16, 2019 , ... ... excited to announce the hiring of Sabrina Kautz as their new VP of ... leadership role in the company as they experience unprecedented growth and new product ...
(Date:3/15/2019)... ... March 15, 2019 , ... Dr. Srini Pillay , a best-selling author, ... chunk of his career subverting ideas on creativity and the processes behind human thinking. ... hit since its original release in 2017. , Now, Pillay is stating that creativity ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: