HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Researchers discover genetic variant that may explain why women develop M.S. more than men

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Why do women develop multiple sclerosis (MS) almost twice as often as men? Physicians have long been intrigued by this fact -- and now a Mayo Clinic-led international research team has identified a genetic variation that may explain it.

The report from collaborators in Minnesota, Northern Ireland, Belgium and Italy appears in the Jan. 27 online publication of the journal Genes & Immunity (http://www.nature.com/gene/).

Significance of the Finding
"In practical terms, this is what our findings suggest: How much of the protein known as 'interferon gamma' you produce appears to be a new key variable in understanding who gets MS and who doesn't, and especially why women develop MS more often than men," explains the study's lead author, Mayo Clinic neurologist Brian Weinshenker, M.D. "If you have a gene that produces high levels of interferon gamma, it may predispose you to developing MS. Under this scenario, men get MS less often because they have a lower frequency of a gene variant that is related to higher secretion of interferon gamma."

To researchers looking for a cure for MS -- where currently there is none -- the finding is helpful for three main reasons: 1) it provides a target at which to direct future investigations into ways to stop MS, 2) it provides leads on ways to improve treatments that can minimize the tissue and nerve damage the disease causes, and 3) it may advance the search for new treatments for other diseases. Notes Dr. Weinshenker, "Our finding isn't the whole genetic cause, but it's a helpful step that could lead us to a more complete understanding of MS -- and ultimately, effective treatment. It's also a very promising lead about gender differences that may pertain to susceptibility of other diseases, too, such as rheumatoid arthritis."

About MS
MS is a complex neurological disease of the covering of the brain and spinal co
'"/>

Contact: Lisa Lucier
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic
27-Jan-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers search for first sign of congestive heart failure
2. Researchers say breast cancer in Africa may provide clues to the disease in African-Americans
3. Researchers close in on breast cancer vaccine
4. Researchers discover link between insulin and Alzheimers
5. Researchers model brains electrical storm during a seizure
6. Researchers track programs success in curbing aggressive behavior
7. Researchers confirm Vioxx nearly doubled cardiovascular risks in cancer prevention study
8. Researchers offer emergency workers a lifeline
9. Researchers map the sexual network of an entire high school
10. Researchers hope monkeys can provide new insights into depression
11. Researchers identify the link between heart failure and weight loss

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/17/2019)... MATEO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... September 17, 2019 ... ... the CE Mark for Europe and the 21st Century Cures Act in the ... spine surgery, radiology, and pain management. Using images from existing MRI equipment ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... 17, 2019 , ... Dr. Jacqueline Subka offers patients with ... A minimally invasive approach to gum surgery, laser dentistry is nearly painless and ... gentle and effective because it simply uses laser light to evaporate diseased tissue. ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... CITY, Mo. (PRWEB) , ... September 17, 2019 ... ... health providers to join the largest accountable care organization (ACO) in the country, ... to join this groundbreaking collaboration to improve care quality and increase cost efficiency. ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 17, 2019 , ... Lubin Austermuehle, P.C. ... Gather for GRIN2B will be held at Found Kitchen and Social House in ... help fund research on GRIN2B-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder, a rare condition that results from changes ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... September 17, 2019 , ... ... the availability of the newly updated International Audit Protocol Consortium (IAPC) EHS audit ... audit protocols to understand the scope of their EHS regulatory obligations and rapidly ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/18/2019)... ... , ... Henry Ford e-Home Care has announced a significant ... Care program. Achieving monthly readmission rates as low as 7%, Henry Ford e-Home ... of 2019 by 45% compared with the prior six months of 2018. Utilizing ...
(Date:9/18/2019)... ... ... U.S. Dermatology Partners was a proud sponsor of the 9th ... The event took place at Lake Ray Hubbard in Rockwall. Over 340 swimmers raised ... money raised helps fund phase 1 clinical trials for cancer research for difficult to ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Scientists writing in a 2017 issue of ... progressive destruction of joint cartilage in osteoarthritis are “on the close horizon.” ... orthopedic surgeon Alejandro Badia, MD , founder and chief medical officer of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: