HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
'Shifty-eyed' monkeys offer window into brain's social reflexes

DURHAM, N.C. -- Neurobiologists at Duke University Medical Center have found the strongest evidence yet that monkeys show the same keen "social reflexes" that humans do -- shifting their attention in response to the direction of gaze of another individual. The researchers said their findings mean that monkeys can provide a critically important animal model of how the brain controls what humans pay attention to in social situations.

Such a model would enable scientists to better understand how processing of social attention works in the brain, and how it can go awry in such disorders as autism. Such basic studies, said the neurobiologists, could lead to better treatments for autism and better methods to teach autistic children.

The researchers, post-doctoral fellow Robert Deaner and Assistant Professor Michael Platt, reported their findings in the Sept. 16, 2003, issue of Current Biology. The research was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Eye Institute.

In their experiments, the researchers compared the eye movements of humans and rhesus macaque monkeys when they were shown images of monkeys looking either to the left or right.

The researchers would first concentrate the human or monkey test subjects' attention to the center of a computer screen by showing them a yellow square. The subjects would then be shown either another square or an image of a monkey looking either left or right. Immediately after that, the face would disappear and to the left or right on the screen a yellow square would flash. The researchers used a magnetic coil technique to measure with high accuracy and speed the eye movements of the subjects.

Explained Platt, "Our prediction was that if seeing a monkey looking in one direction or another actually changes where you're paying attention, then you should shift your gaze faster if the box appears in the direction in which that monkey face was looking and slower in the othe
'"/>

Contact: Dennis Meredith
dennis.meredith@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University
15-Sep-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Rhesus monkeys reason about perspectives of others in obtaining food
2. Researchers hope monkeys can provide new insights into depression
3. Soy likely doesnt affect fertility, according to research in monkeys
4. Research in monkeys suggests estrogen therapy may lower androgens in postmenopausal women
5. Scientists find HIV-blocking protein in monkeys
6. Promising West Nile virus vaccine protects monkeys
7. Fast-acting ebola vaccine protects monkeys
8. OHSU scientists seek to advance the study of human disease by taking steps to clone identical monkeys through embryo splitting
9. UCSF study offers insight into human circadian rhythms
10. Research offers hope of new treatments for liver damage
11. Portable system offers dialysis patients liberating changes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/1/2018)... ... ... SignatureCare Emergency Center is looking to award their 2018 Fall Scholarship. The $1000 ... your applications in now as the deadline is approaching fast. (July 31) , SignatureCare ... student at Texas Southern University. Wu was inspired to go into the medical field ...
(Date:8/31/2018)... ... 31, 2018 , ... MedMark Treatment Centers Kentwood, a BayMark ... from 1:00-3:00 pm. MedMark invites the community to explore the world ... meet our staff and learn more about medication-assisted treatment services. MedMark Kentwood can ...
(Date:8/31/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... August 31, 2018 , ... Nitro Circus ... SeaLegs at the Beach – an action sports gathering to celebrate the life of ... The event raised money for Erik’s wife, Annika and their two small children, Oskar ...
(Date:8/31/2018)... ... 2018 , ... ZPower, the world’s only developer of rechargeable, ... Information Officer. Arneja previously served as Director of Information Systems and in his ... scale, and innovate the business. , Prior to joining ZPower, Arneja gained ...
(Date:8/29/2018)... ... August 29, 2018 , ... ... socialize or communicate with others. Physically, it is not possible to identify people ... problems may be challenged. People with autism may need assistance in developing skills, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/15/2018)... ... September 14, 2018 , ... Harris Teeter announced ... affected by Hurricane Florence. , Throughout the month of September, the company invites ... or round up their transaction to the nearest dollar to help support the ...
(Date:9/13/2018)... ... September 13, 2018 , ... This September is Centers ... is designed to raise awareness on how to help prevent food poisoning. According to ... get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from eating contaminated food. In support ...
(Date:9/13/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... September 13, 2018 , ... ... is now available to test and ensure correct implementation of the NCPDP ... SCRIPT Version 2017071 includes important functionality and transactions identified by the industry as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: