HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Significant disparities still exist in screening mammography rates; minorities underestimated

CHICAGO -- Disparities in mammography screening rates have improved over the past decade but a significant percentage of women in several groups still face barriers to screening, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center reviewed published literature examining disparities among racial groups in accessing mammography-screening services. They found that women with lower socioeconomic backgrounds, the uninsured, women without a usual source of care, the elderly, recent immigrants, women in rural areas and some racial/ethnic minorities such as Native Americans/Alaskan Natives and Hispanics obtained mammography screenings at a markedly lower rate than the rest of the population.

"We also found that there is evidence that the actual magnitude of these disparities, particularly among low-income racial/ethnic minorities, is underestimated and that disparities persist for some subpopulations of Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders and African Americans," said Dr. Monica Peek, internist at Rush University Medical Center and author of the study.

Peek explained that the national surveys that estimate health behavior in the United States -- The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) -- under sample ethnic minorities, particularly those at risk for under-screening. The BRFSS study is primarily a telephone survey, and this method under-samples those who may not have telephones such as persons living in the southern United States, African Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans. Additionally, the questionnaires are typically given in English, and those who are not proficient in English are not eligible to take the survey.

Peek pointed out that in the BRFSS study, only 11.2 percent of women surveyed were uninsured; 75.4 percent were white; 9.7 percent African Americans; 11.1 percent Hispanics,
'"/>

Contact: Chris Martin
cmartin@rush.edu
312-942-7820
Rush University Medical Center
13-Feb-2004


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Significant pain relief following gastric bypass surgery
2. Significantly lower physical activity levels in obese adolescents contribute to continued obesity
3. Interferon Significantly Affects Metabolism Of Other Drugs Given To Cancer Patients, Finds University Of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute
4. Relaxation And Music Significantly Reduce Patients Postoperative Pain
5. Beta Blocker Significantly Improves Heart Failure Survival
6. Novel Therapy Significantly Reduces Spinal Fractures In Postmenopausal WomenWith Two Years Of Therapy
7. Cardiologists underestimate racial and ethnic disparities in care
8. Cardiovascular health disparities must be eradicated
9. Health care report cards may increase racial/ethnic disparities in bypass operations
10. Ending racial disparities in health care could save 5 times more lives than tech advances
11. USC researchers highlight disparities in cancer rates among racial and ethnic groups in California

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents ... the American College of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and ... highly effective treatment for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Aliso Viejo, California (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... preset to fit their specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film ... all fully customizable and all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned ... the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at ... fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland ... iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness ... & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent ... that most people are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that individuals ... also many of these less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Any dentist who has made an implant supported denture ... of them do not even offer this as a viable ... costs involved. And those who ARE able to offer that ... cost that the majority of today,s patients would not be ... , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor of Implanova ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the ... 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report to their offering. ... up to date financial data derived from varied research sources ... with potential impact on the market during the next five ... comprises of sub markets, regional and country level analysis. The ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 , , , WHEN: ... 2016 , , , , LOCATION: , , , Online, ... , , EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , Frost & Sullivan,s Global ... Bird; Senior Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and Unmesh Lal, Program Manager ... pharmaceutical industry is witnessing an exceptional era. Several new demand spaces, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: